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Flashcards - History of American Law

Flashcards - History of American Law
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Business law
Commercial law, also known as business law, is the body of law that applies to the rights, relations, and conduct of persons and businesses engaged in commerce, merchandising, trade, and sales
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common law system
A common law legal system is characterized by case law developed by judges, courts, and similar tribunals, when giving decisions in individual cases that have precedential effect on future cases
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law
Law is a system of rules that are enforced through social institutions to govern behavior
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6 cards in set
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law
Law is a system of rules that are enforced through social institutions to govern behavior
common law system
A common law legal system is characterized by case law developed by judges, courts, and similar tribunals, when giving decisions in individual cases that have precedential effect on future cases
Business law
Commercial law, also known as business law, is the body of law that applies to the rights, relations, and conduct of persons and businesses engaged in commerce, merchandising, trade, and sales
contract law
A contract is a voluntary arrangement between two or more parties that is enforceable at law as a binding legal agreement
statutory law
Statutory law or statute law is written law set down by a body of legislature or by a singular legislator
bankruptcy
Bankruptcy is a legal status of a person or other entity that cannot repay the debts it owes to creditors

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