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Flashcards - NES Essential Academic Skills Reading: Interpretation

Flashcards - NES Essential Academic Skills Reading: Interpretation
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analogy
Analogy is a cognitive process of transferring information or meaning from a particular subject to another , or a linguistic expression corresponding to such a process
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allusion
Allusion is a figure of speech, in which one refers covertly or indirectly to an object or circumstance from an external context
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plot
Plot refers to the sequence of events inside a story which affect other events through the principle of cause and effect
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7 cards in set
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plot
Plot refers to the sequence of events inside a story which affect other events through the principle of cause and effect
allusion
Allusion is a figure of speech, in which one refers covertly or indirectly to an object or circumstance from an external context
analogy
Analogy is a cognitive process of transferring information or meaning from a particular subject to another , or a linguistic expression corresponding to such a process
tone
In literature, the tone of a literary work expresses the writer's attitude toward or feelings about the subject matter and audience
anecdote
An anecdote is a brief, revealing account of an individual person or an incident
denotation
Denotation is a translation of a sign to its meaning, precisely to its literal meaning, more or less like dictionaries try to define it
first person point of view
A first-person narrative is a story from the first-person perspective: the viewpoint of a character writing or speaking directly about themselves

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