Flashcards - NY Regents - History of Ancient Greece: Help and Review

Flashcards - NY Regents - History of Ancient Greece: Help and Review
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Spartan helot
The helots were a subjugated population group that formed the main population of Laconia and Messenia, the territory controlled by Sparta
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Sparta
Sparta was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece
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Athens
Athens is the capital and largest city of Greece
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Kouros
A kouros is the modern term given to free-standing ancient Greek sculptures which first appear in the Archaic period in Greece and represent nude male youths
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idealism
In philosophy, idealism is the group of philosophies which assert that reality, or reality as we can know it, is fundamentally mental, mentally constructed, or otherwise immaterial
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Hestia
In Ancient Greek religion, Hestia is a virgin goddess of the hearth, architecture, and the right ordering of domesticity, the family, the home, and the state
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Cronos
In Greek mythology, Cronus, or Kronos , was the leader and youngest of the first generation of Titans, the divine descendants of Uranus, the sky, and Gaia, the earth
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Homer
Homer is best known as the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey
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Achilles
In Greek mythology, Achilles was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad
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Zeus
Zeus was the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who ruled as king of the gods of Mount Olympus
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Selene
In Greek mythology, Selene is the goddess of the moon
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22 cards in set
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Selene
In Greek mythology, Selene is the goddess of the moon
Zeus
Zeus was the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who ruled as king of the gods of Mount Olympus
Achilles
In Greek mythology, Achilles was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad
Homer
Homer is best known as the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey
Cronos
In Greek mythology, Cronus, or Kronos , was the leader and youngest of the first generation of Titans, the divine descendants of Uranus, the sky, and Gaia, the earth
Hestia
In Ancient Greek religion, Hestia is a virgin goddess of the hearth, architecture, and the right ordering of domesticity, the family, the home, and the state
idealism
In philosophy, idealism is the group of philosophies which assert that reality, or reality as we can know it, is fundamentally mental, mentally constructed, or otherwise immaterial
Kouros
A kouros is the modern term given to free-standing ancient Greek sculptures which first appear in the Archaic period in Greece and represent nude male youths
Athens
Athens is the capital and largest city of Greece
Sparta
Sparta was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece
Spartan helot
The helots were a subjugated population group that formed the main population of Laconia and Messenia, the territory controlled by Sparta
cella
A cella or naos is the inner chamber of a temple in classical architecture, or a shop facing the street in domestic Roman architecture, such as a domus
Peloponnesian War
The Peloponnesian War was an ancient Greek war fought by Athens and its empire against the Peloponnesian League led by Sparta
Aeschylus
Aeschylus was an ancient Greek tragedian
Aristophanes
Aristophanes , son of Philippus, of the deme Kydathenaion , was a comic playwright of ancient Athens
Elysian Fields
Elysium or the Elysian Fields is a conception of the afterlife that developed over time and was maintained by some Greek religious and philosophical sects and cults
Oresteia
The Oresteia is a trilogy of Greek tragedies written by Aeschylus concerning the end of the curse on the House of Atreus and the pacification of the Erinyes
abjad
An abjad is a type of writing system where each symbol stands for a consonant, leaving the reader to supply the appropriate vowel
competition
Competition is, in general, a contest or rivalry between two or more organisms, animals, individuals, economic groups or social groups, etc
Democritus
Democritus was an influential Ancient Greek pre-Socratic philosopher primarily remembered today for his formulation of an atomic theory of the universe
Thales
Thales of Miletus was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, mathematician and astronomer from Miletus in Asia Minor, current day Milet in Turkey and one of the Seven Sages of Greece
Zeno
Zeno of Elea was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher of Magna Graecia and a member of the Eleatic School founded by Parmenides

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