Flashcards - Overview of Nuclear Processes

Flashcards - Overview of Nuclear Processes
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beta decay
In nuclear physics, beta decay is a type of radioactive decay in which a beta ray, and a respective neutrino are emitted from an atomic nucleus
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nucleons
In chemistry and physics, a nucleon is one of the particles that make up the atomic nucleus
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alpha particle
Alpha particles consist of two protons and two neutrons bound together into a particle identical to a helium nucleus
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alpha particle
Alpha particles consist of two protons and two neutrons bound together into a particle identical to a helium nucleus
nucleons
In chemistry and physics, a nucleon is one of the particles that make up the atomic nucleus
beta decay
In nuclear physics, beta decay is a type of radioactive decay in which a beta ray, and a respective neutrino are emitted from an atomic nucleus
half-life
Half-life is the time required for a quantity to reduce to half its initial value
reactants
A reagent /riˈeɪdʒənt/ is a substance or compound added to a system to cause a chemical reaction, or added to see if a reaction occurs
radioactive decay
Radioactive decay is the process by which the nucleus of an unstable atom loses energy by emitting radiation, including alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, and conversion electrons
Radiocarbon dating
Radiocarbon dating is a method for determining the age of an object containing organic material by using the properties of radiocarbon , a radioactive isotope of carbon

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