Flashcards - The Federal Bureaucracy in the United States

Flashcards - The Federal Bureaucracy in the United States
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New Deal
The New Deal was a series of social liberal programs enacted in the United States between 1933 and 1938, and a few that came later
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Conflict
In literature, the literary element conflict is an inherent incompatibility between the objectives of two or more characters or forces
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bureaucracy
A bureaucracy is \""""a body of non-elective government officials\"""" and/or \""""an administrative policy-making group\""""
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bureaucracy
A bureaucracy is \""""a body of non-elective government officials\"""" and/or \""""an administrative policy-making group\""""
Conflict
In literature, the literary element conflict is an inherent incompatibility between the objectives of two or more characters or forces
New Deal
The New Deal was a series of social liberal programs enacted in the United States between 1933 and 1938, and a few that came later
Bureaucrats
A bureaucrat is a member of a bureaucracy and can compose the administration of any organization of any size, although the term usually connotes someone within an institution of government
Red tape
Red tape is an idiom that refers to excessive regulation or rigid conformity to formal rules that is considered redundant or bureaucratic and hinders or prevents action or decision-making
Issue networks
Issue networks are an alliance of various interest groups and individuals who unite in order to promote a single issue in government policy

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