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Flashcards - The Judicial Branch of the U.S.

Flashcards - The Judicial Branch of the U.S.
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original jurisdiction
The original jurisdiction of a court is the power to hear a case for the first time, as opposed to appellate jurisdiction, when a higher court has the power to review a lower court's decision
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judicial review
Judicial review is a process under which executive and legislative actions are subject to review by the judiciary
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district courts
The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system
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circuit courts
Circuit court is the name of court systems in several common law jurisdictions
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9 cards in set
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circuit courts
Circuit court is the name of court systems in several common law jurisdictions
district courts
The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system
judicial review
Judicial review is a process under which executive and legislative actions are subject to review by the judiciary
original jurisdiction
The original jurisdiction of a court is the power to hear a case for the first time, as opposed to appellate jurisdiction, when a higher court has the power to review a lower court's decision
oral arguments
Oral arguments are spoken to a judge or appellate court by a lawyer of the legal reasons why they should prevail
peremptory
In English and American law, the right of peremptory challenge is a right in jury selection for the attorneys to reject a certain number of potential jurors without stating a reason
removal for cause
Strike for cause is a method of eliminating potential members from a jury panel in the United States
collateral estoppel
Collateral estoppel , known in modern terminology as issue preclusion, is a common law estoppel doctrine that prevents a person from relitigating an issue
opinion
In general, an opinion is a judgment, viewpoint, or statement that is not conclusive

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