FTCE Communication & Media Literacy Flashcards

FTCE Communication & Media Literacy Flashcards
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Collaborative Skills
How well we are able to work with others, such as initiating conversations, offering and accepting constructive criticism, expressing emotions, and taking turns
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Pragmatic Skills
The 'rules' of conversation, such as taking turns, acknowledging others, and keeping eye contact
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Expressive Skills
Being able to communicate how one feels about a topic
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Organizing Speech
Speakers must learn to organize what they are saying so that it makes sense to a listener and flows sequentially.
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To Project the Voice
This mechanical skill relates to how soft or loud someone is speaking
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Nonverbal Cues
Body language, voice volume and tenor, and rate of speech are examples of nonverbal cues. These add additional meaning to a conversation without spoken language.
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Self-Monitoring
The ability to evaluate yourself and decide if you want to continue doing the same thing or change directions
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Questioning and Clarifying
Asking questions in order to gather more information and add more meaning to a conversation
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Summarizing
Repeating back the entire message that someone has said, understanding the whole meaning
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Paraphrasing
Repeating back to someone what they have said
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Active Listening
Paying special attention to what someone is saying so that you understand the way they feel
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Word Spacing
It is important to teach students to separate words and not let them run together.
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Tall Letters vs. Small Letters
In penmanship, tall letters, such as 't', 'h', and 'f' extend above small letters, such as 'e', 'a', and 'n'
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Letter Strokes
An aspect of penmanship where students practice the shapes of letters
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28 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

One of the most important skills that students will acquire from school is the ability to communicate with others. Whether or not communication is a written component of our curriculum, it is an integral part of teaching. This flashcard set touches on some of the most important forms of communication, from listening and speaking skills, to internet research skills, to technology literacy. You will review important ideas such as, paraphrasing, plagarism, classroom technology, and many more.

Front
Back
Letter Strokes
An aspect of penmanship where students practice the shapes of letters
Tall Letters vs. Small Letters
In penmanship, tall letters, such as 't', 'h', and 'f' extend above small letters, such as 'e', 'a', and 'n'
Word Spacing
It is important to teach students to separate words and not let them run together.
Active Listening
Paying special attention to what someone is saying so that you understand the way they feel
Paraphrasing
Repeating back to someone what they have said
Summarizing
Repeating back the entire message that someone has said, understanding the whole meaning
Questioning and Clarifying
Asking questions in order to gather more information and add more meaning to a conversation
Self-Monitoring
The ability to evaluate yourself and decide if you want to continue doing the same thing or change directions
Nonverbal Cues
Body language, voice volume and tenor, and rate of speech are examples of nonverbal cues. These add additional meaning to a conversation without spoken language.
To Project the Voice
This mechanical skill relates to how soft or loud someone is speaking
Organizing Speech
Speakers must learn to organize what they are saying so that it makes sense to a listener and flows sequentially.
Expressive Skills
Being able to communicate how one feels about a topic
Pragmatic Skills
The 'rules' of conversation, such as taking turns, acknowledging others, and keeping eye contact
Collaborative Skills
How well we are able to work with others, such as initiating conversations, offering and accepting constructive criticism, expressing emotions, and taking turns
Online Source
A digital medium, such as websites, online journals, or news sites
APA citation
American Psychological Association, requires in-text citations that include the author and year
MLA
Modern Language Association, requires in-text citation that must include the author and page number
Five W's When Evaluating Online Sources
1. Who wrote it?, 2. What is the content?, 3. Why was it written?, 4. When was this written?, 5. Where has the information originated?
Primary Source
An artifact that comes from the time period that you are researching (e.g. If you are studying the civil war, you might look for a soldier's diary, newspaper articles, or original photographs.)
Secondary Source
Information that is written about something in the past and often includes the author's interpretation of events (e.g. a peer-reviewed journal article, or a textbook)
Types of Primary Sources
Diaries, newspapers, speeches, film, paintings, clothing, tools, photographs, manuscripts, equipment (as long as they come from the time period you are studying)
Primary Source Locations
Libraries, online databases (such as ProQuest), museums (historical, monuments, art, etc.), various internet websites (such as Archive.org)
Two Questions to Help Find Meaning in Visual Media
1. What is the literal depiction of the image?, and 2. How has the creator chosen to show this image and why does it matter?
Plagarism
Taking someone else's words, ideas, or creations and passing them off as your own (intellectual theft)
3 Questions to Avoid Plagarism
1. Where did I get this information?, 2. Am I using this information factually?, and 3. Have other sources published this information?
Types of Classroom Technology
Computers, tablets (iPads, eReaders, etc.), Smartboards (interactive projection screen)
Web 2.0
The next generation of internet use that mostly includes social media tools (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr)
Visual Display Technologies
Presenting information through images (e.g. PowerPoint, interactive projection screens, videos)

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