Copyright

FTCE Emergent Literacy Flashcards

FTCE Emergent Literacy Flashcards
1/24 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Grammar
How sentences are built, the rules for sentence construction
Got it
Vocabulary
Words in a language. When young children are exposed to larger vocabularies in their environment, they tend to pick up oral language more quickly.
Got it
Phonology
A language's fundamental system of sounds, and the relationships between those sounds
Got it
Oral Language
The skills to communicate orally, or the ability to speak and use conventions of a spoken language.
Got it
Receptive Language
How children understand the communication of others, like following instructions, and comprehending stories
Got it
Expressive Language
The ways that children learn to communicate with others, such as naming objects, describing the world around them, asking questions, and telling stories
Got it
Whole-Language Approach
An approach to literacy that emphasizes the function of reading, and not just the skill or content. (For example, the different functions of reading a recipe versus a letter.)
Got it
Stage 1 Literacy
The stage when children learn to read by sounding out words, typically in first and second grade
Got it
Stage 0 Literacy
The first stage of emergent literacy from ages 0 to 5, when children begin to learn about reading. This may include learning the alphabet and recognizing that letters relate to sounds.
Got it
Phonemes

Individual small sounds that make words.

Phonemes can include blended sounds, such as 'br' or 'sh', or single letter sounds, such as 'p' and 'b'.

Got it
Emergent Literacy
The idea that children start learning about reading, writing, and language from infancy through early childhood
Got it
Literacy
The ability to read and write
Got it
24 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards explores the concept of Emergent Literacy. The set reviews important terms related to early literacy and oral language, as well as important-to-know developmental stages in literacy learning for children. It is designed to cover topics necessary for this portion of the FTCE exam, and to provide a refresher on theories and classroom strategies for teaching early childhood literacy skills.

Front
Back
Literacy
The ability to read and write
Emergent Literacy
The idea that children start learning about reading, writing, and language from infancy through early childhood
Phonemes

Individual small sounds that make words.

Phonemes can include blended sounds, such as 'br' or 'sh', or single letter sounds, such as 'p' and 'b'.

Stage 0 Literacy
The first stage of emergent literacy from ages 0 to 5, when children begin to learn about reading. This may include learning the alphabet and recognizing that letters relate to sounds.
Stage 1 Literacy
The stage when children learn to read by sounding out words, typically in first and second grade
Whole-Language Approach
An approach to literacy that emphasizes the function of reading, and not just the skill or content. (For example, the different functions of reading a recipe versus a letter.)
Expressive Language
The ways that children learn to communicate with others, such as naming objects, describing the world around them, asking questions, and telling stories
Receptive Language
How children understand the communication of others, like following instructions, and comprehending stories
Oral Language
The skills to communicate orally, or the ability to speak and use conventions of a spoken language.
Phonology
A language's fundamental system of sounds, and the relationships between those sounds
Vocabulary
Words in a language. When young children are exposed to larger vocabularies in their environment, they tend to pick up oral language more quickly.
Grammar
How sentences are built, the rules for sentence construction
Morphology

How words are formed and related to one another.

For instance, root words, prefixes, suffixes, and parts of speech are related to morphology.

Pragmatics
Proper usage of language, specifically as it relates to context
Discourse
How language is used to communicate in conversations, writing, or social contexts
Phonology, vocabulary, grammar, morphology, pragmatics, and discourse are six components of _____.
oral language
Phonological Awareness
A developing ability to recognize phonemes, or sounds in speech, and to manipulate them. Phonological awareness develops starting around age 2, as kids learn to recognize rhymes and particular phonemes.
Around ages 4-5, children can start to count both syllables and _____, or individual units of sound in speech.
Phonemes
Letters
Symbols for sounds
The Alphabetic Principle
The understanding that letters relate to sounds, and knowledge of how each letter specifically relates to particular sounds
Bilingual
Describes a home or environment in which people communicate regularly in two different languages. Bilingual also can describe individuals who fluently speak two languages.
Decoding
A way to describe the process of how students read: by recognizing letters, their associated sounds, and how those sounds come together to form words.
Encoding
A way to describe the process of learning to write: taking apart a word, remembering the letters for sounds, and stringing those letters together to form written words.
Print-rich Environment
Learning spaces that offer substantial exposure to printed or written language. This includes things like calendars, instructions, class rules, daily schedules, and student writing.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support