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FTCE History's Impact on World Institutions Flashcards

FTCE History's Impact on World Institutions Flashcards
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The Protestant Reformation
Inspired by Martin Luther in 1517, the Protestant Reformation protested the Catholic Church's power across Europe and promoted accessible education, individualism, democracy and capitalism.
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Social Institutions
Groups of people who come together for a shared purpose or cause, such as churches, schools, social movements, and subcultures.
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Detroit and the American Armament Program
Detroit became a boom town during World War II as factories, like the Ford Motor Company, began manufacturing weaponry, planes, and tanks.
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The Economic Impact of Pearl Harbor
After the Pearl Harbor bombing, American factories began making planes and weapons for the American armament program. The related economic boom pulled the U.S. out of the Great Depression.
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The First Transcontinental Railroad
A major technological achievement completed in 1869, the railroad made way for economic development all across the Continental U.S.
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Protestant Work Ethic
A sensibility that arose out of the Protestant Reformation, which values both hard work and the rewards of material wealth.
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Capitalism
An economic system based on free markets and private ownership, with little to no government interference.
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Historical Causation
How one historical event causes another. In other words, the cause and effect of historical events.
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Economic Institutions
A way of talking about economic patterns, structures, banks, corporations, organizations and companies.
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Black Tuesday
October 29, 1929, the day of the most devastating stock market crash in American history, and the start of the Great Depression.
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20 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards looks closely at how history impacts world institutions, specifically economic, social and political institutions. Review key concepts related to this topic, as well as a number of specific examples that illustrate historical causation in economic, social, and political contexts.

Front
Back
Black Tuesday
October 29, 1929, the day of the most devastating stock market crash in American history, and the start of the Great Depression.
Economic Institutions
A way of talking about economic patterns, structures, banks, corporations, organizations and companies.
Historical Causation
How one historical event causes another. In other words, the cause and effect of historical events.
Capitalism
An economic system based on free markets and private ownership, with little to no government interference.
Protestant Work Ethic
A sensibility that arose out of the Protestant Reformation, which values both hard work and the rewards of material wealth.
The First Transcontinental Railroad
A major technological achievement completed in 1869, the railroad made way for economic development all across the Continental U.S.
The Economic Impact of Pearl Harbor
After the Pearl Harbor bombing, American factories began making planes and weapons for the American armament program. The related economic boom pulled the U.S. out of the Great Depression.
Detroit and the American Armament Program
Detroit became a boom town during World War II as factories, like the Ford Motor Company, began manufacturing weaponry, planes, and tanks.
Social Institutions
Groups of people who come together for a shared purpose or cause, such as churches, schools, social movements, and subcultures.
The Protestant Reformation
Inspired by Martin Luther in 1517, the Protestant Reformation protested the Catholic Church's power across Europe and promoted accessible education, individualism, democracy and capitalism.
Nazi Germany
Germany's government from 1933-1945 and a social revolution that transformed German society. German losses in World War I enabled Hitler's rise to power and the spread of Nazism.
The Ford Model T and Its Social Impact
Henry Ford produced the Model T car at an affordable price, which led to many social changes for travel industries, youth culture and dating, and leisure activities like car clubs and racing.
Political Institutions
A way of referring to any aspect of the political realm, including political parties, leaders, ideologies, movements, and trends.
The Civil Rights Movement
A political and social movement that organized protests and civil disobedience in support of African-American rights in 1950s and 60s America, and which led to major political reforms.
Martin Luther King Jr.
The most recognizable leader of the Civil Rights Movement; known for his 'I Have A Dream' speech and profound civil rights leadership.
The 1964 Civil Rights Act
An achievement of the Civil Rights Movement, this Act made discrimination illegal when based on race, religion, color, sex, or national origin. It was signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson.
The Reichstag Fire
A fire in the German Reichstag Building in 1933, which Hitler used to convince people that Communists were a grave threat and that their defeat required the sacrifice of German civil liberties.
Enabling Act of 1933
The law that legally made Hitler into a German dictator by transforming German political structures and stripping citizens of civil liberties. The Act was passed after the Reichstag Fire.
The Quasi-War
An unpopular, undeclared naval war between America and France around the turn of the 19th century, which contributed to the passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts.
Alien and Sedition Acts
Acts signed by President John Adams in 1798 criminalizing speech against the U.S. government and limiting immigration. These Acts violated free expression and were reactions to the Quasi-War.

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