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FTCE Literary Analysis & Genres Flashcards

FTCE Literary Analysis & Genres Flashcards
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Euphemism
A literary device that occurs when a writer uses lighter terminology and imagery to describe something that is too graphic when described literally.
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Epigraph
This literary device is similar to allusion as it refers the reader back to another story. This reference is presented in a way that stands alone from the text, rather than integrated in it.
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Diction
This literary device emphasizes the author's word choice. Strategic decisions are made based on a word's connotation to decide the best word to use to achieve the desired effect.
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Allusion
A literary device in which the author calls the reader back to another story in order to add context. The Bible is the most commonly alluded work of literature.
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Literary Devices
Techniques that a writer might employ to further engage the reader. Examples include allusion, foreshadowing, personification, and euphemism.
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Multicultural Literature
These literary works present a description of how people live in varying parts of the world, including their culture and belief system. Works in this category do not contain stereotypes.
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Sub-Genres
More specific categories that fall within the main genres. Examples include romance, mystery, science fiction, comedy,, tragedy, action, and horror.
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Drama
A genre characterized by anything that is written with the intent of being performed. In drama, dialogue is the foundation for establishing characters, setting, and plot.
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Nonfiction
A genre of literature that consists of works that stem from events that happened in real life. Newspapers, diaries, and autobiographies are examples of nonfiction.
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Fiction
Like poetry, this genre of literature is also full of figurative language. Fiction works are characterized by being not true or real. Some fiction texts occur in the distant past or future.
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Poetry
The genre of literature characterized with written in lines and stanzas, not complete sentences. Often poetry is shorter than narratives and contains a variety of figurative language.
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The four main literary genres.
Poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama are the four main literary genres.
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Genre
This word means 'type' or 'kind.' In entertainment, these are works that share similar characteristics and thus are categorized into the same genre.
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27 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Dive into the world of literary genres, figurative language, and literary devices with this set of flashcards. In any given text, authors regularly employ a variety of different figurative language techniques and literary devices to engage their readers. Use this set of flashcards to prepare yourself to identify and teach these important aspects of literary analysis while also reviewing reading and writing strategies to employ in your classroom.

Front
Back
Genre
This word means 'type' or 'kind.' In entertainment, these are works that share similar characteristics and thus are categorized into the same genre.
The four main literary genres.
Poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama are the four main literary genres.
Poetry
The genre of literature characterized with written in lines and stanzas, not complete sentences. Often poetry is shorter than narratives and contains a variety of figurative language.
Fiction
Like poetry, this genre of literature is also full of figurative language. Fiction works are characterized by being not true or real. Some fiction texts occur in the distant past or future.
Nonfiction
A genre of literature that consists of works that stem from events that happened in real life. Newspapers, diaries, and autobiographies are examples of nonfiction.
Drama
A genre characterized by anything that is written with the intent of being performed. In drama, dialogue is the foundation for establishing characters, setting, and plot.
Sub-Genres
More specific categories that fall within the main genres. Examples include romance, mystery, science fiction, comedy,, tragedy, action, and horror.
Multicultural Literature
These literary works present a description of how people live in varying parts of the world, including their culture and belief system. Works in this category do not contain stereotypes.
Literary Devices
Techniques that a writer might employ to further engage the reader. Examples include allusion, foreshadowing, personification, and euphemism.
Allusion
A literary device in which the author calls the reader back to another story in order to add context. The Bible is the most commonly alluded work of literature.
Diction
This literary device emphasizes the author's word choice. Strategic decisions are made based on a word's connotation to decide the best word to use to achieve the desired effect.
Epigraph
This literary device is similar to allusion as it refers the reader back to another story. This reference is presented in a way that stands alone from the text, rather than integrated in it.
Euphemism
A literary device that occurs when a writer uses lighter terminology and imagery to describe something that is too graphic when described literally.
Foreshadowing
A literary device in which the author gives clues or hints about something that will resolve later in the story.
Imagery
This literary device uses high levels of sensory details and associations to heighten the reader's engagement with the story.
Hyperbole
A literary device in which the author engages in excessive exaggeration to make a certain point.
Name the literary device used here: I am so hungry, I could eat an entire horse.
This is an example of hyperbole. The author is using exaggeration to depict a high level of hunger.
Onomatopoeia
A word that is pronounced and looks similar to the sound it makes. Examples include slam, splash, bam, babble, warble, and gurgle.
Figurative Language
A broad term describing a style of writing that uses metaphors, similes, and other figures of speech to make a text more interesting and meaningful.
Metaphor
A form of figurative language that compares two unlike objects. For example: the students were angels for the substitute, compares students to angels to express their good behavior.
Simile
A comparison that uses the words 'like' or 'as' to describe two objects. For example: it is as hot as the inside of the oven.
Personification
This occurs when an author applies human characteristics to a nonhuman object. For example: the sun smiled down at the children playing.
Reflective Writing
The act of writing a reaction about an experience or after learning something new. This solidifies knowledge and allows for reflection.
Name the strategy used in this example: A teacher provides a question that a student must answer before leaving class for the day.
Exit Slips - Tools that can be used for reflection following a lesson or to check for student comprehension.
Sixty Second Write (Strategy)
A strategy that encourages students to take one minute to write following a lesson. This allows students to process through information prior to transitioning to a new topic.
Reading Comprehension
A term used to describe a reader's understanding of a written text.
Reading Comprehension Assessments
Formal or informal measurements of a student's ability to understand a text. Examples include predictions, identifying aspects of text, visualization, connections, and making evaluations.

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