FTCE Physical Science Flashcards

FTCE Physical Science Flashcards
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Name the two categories that all forms of energy can be put in.
Potential and kinetic. Potential energy is stored energy, while kinetic energy is energy in motion.
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Mixture
A mixture occurs when two or more substances come together, but do not create a chemical attachment. The substances keep their unique identities.
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Compound
A molecule that contains more than one type of element. Examples include water (hydrogen and oxygen) and salt (sodium and chloride).
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Molecule
A group of two or more atoms. They can be comprised of many of the same atomic elements or a combination of different elements.
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Identify the number of elements.
There are a total of 118 elements. Many elements are found naturally in the world, while others are created in laboratories.
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Name the part of the atom indicated here.
This is the atomic nucleus. It holds protons and neutrons. Surrounding it are electrons, in the electron cloud.
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Identify this.
This is the Periodic Table of Elements. It lists elements, a substance made up of a certain type of atom. It is organized in a way that provides scientists with information about each element.
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Atom
The simplest and most basic unit of matter. They are comprised of protons (positive charge), neutrons (neutral charge), and electrons (negative charge).
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Name the two types of heterogeneous mixtures.
Suspensions and colloids. Suspensions contain substances that when left alone will separate and can be separated using a filter. Colloids require more intense means to separate.
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Heterogeneous mixture
This is a mixture of substances that can be separated and individual substances are able to be detected. Examples include milk, muddy water, and Italian salad dressing.
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Homogeneous mixtures
Also known as solutions, this a mixture of substances that cannot be easily separated or identified. These can be gasses, liquids, or solids. Examples include the air, steel, and soft drinks.
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Name the process represented here.
This diagram represents the phase change cycle of matter.
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Name the eight types of phase changes.
Freezing, melting, sublimation, deposition, condensation, vaporization, ionization, and recombination are the eight different types of phase changes that matter can go through.
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Identify the difference between a physical change and a chemical change.
A physical change is a transformation in form, but atom and molecule connections are still the same. Chemical changes cause atoms to form a new substance.
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Phase change
This occurs when matter transitions from one state to another. Matter can change between solid, liquid, and gas.
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Identify hardness, density and odor as intensive or extensive physical properties of matter.
They are examples of intensive physical properties. This means that they are physical properties that do not differ depending on the amount of matter present.
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Identify color and volume as intensive or extensive physical properties of matter.
They are examples of extensive physical properties. This means that they differ depending on the amount of matter present.
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Matter
Any physical object that has mass and occupies space. Matter can be either liquid, gas, or solid. It has both physical and chemical characteristics.
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Flashcard Content Overview

Physical Science covers a variety of topics dealing with the smallest units of life to universal laws of motion. These flashcards will help you break down all the essential elements of Physical Science through exposing you to practical application cards, key terminology, and relatable real-life examples. You'll be speaking like a scientist in no time!

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Matter
Any physical object that has mass and occupies space. Matter can be either liquid, gas, or solid. It has both physical and chemical characteristics.
Identify color and volume as intensive or extensive physical properties of matter.
They are examples of extensive physical properties. This means that they differ depending on the amount of matter present.
Identify hardness, density and odor as intensive or extensive physical properties of matter.
They are examples of intensive physical properties. This means that they are physical properties that do not differ depending on the amount of matter present.
Phase change
This occurs when matter transitions from one state to another. Matter can change between solid, liquid, and gas.
Identify the difference between a physical change and a chemical change.
A physical change is a transformation in form, but atom and molecule connections are still the same. Chemical changes cause atoms to form a new substance.
Name the eight types of phase changes.
Freezing, melting, sublimation, deposition, condensation, vaporization, ionization, and recombination are the eight different types of phase changes that matter can go through.
Name the process represented here.
This diagram represents the phase change cycle of matter.
Homogeneous mixtures
Also known as solutions, this a mixture of substances that cannot be easily separated or identified. These can be gasses, liquids, or solids. Examples include the air, steel, and soft drinks.
Heterogeneous mixture
This is a mixture of substances that can be separated and individual substances are able to be detected. Examples include milk, muddy water, and Italian salad dressing.
Name the two types of heterogeneous mixtures.
Suspensions and colloids. Suspensions contain substances that when left alone will separate and can be separated using a filter. Colloids require more intense means to separate.
Atom
The simplest and most basic unit of matter. They are comprised of protons (positive charge), neutrons (neutral charge), and electrons (negative charge).
Identify this.
This is the Periodic Table of Elements. It lists elements, a substance made up of a certain type of atom. It is organized in a way that provides scientists with information about each element.
Name the part of the atom indicated here.
This is the atomic nucleus. It holds protons and neutrons. Surrounding it are electrons, in the electron cloud.
Identify the number of elements.
There are a total of 118 elements. Many elements are found naturally in the world, while others are created in laboratories.
Molecule
A group of two or more atoms. They can be comprised of many of the same atomic elements or a combination of different elements.
Compound
A molecule that contains more than one type of element. Examples include water (hydrogen and oxygen) and salt (sodium and chloride).
Mixture
A mixture occurs when two or more substances come together, but do not create a chemical attachment. The substances keep their unique identities.
Name the two categories that all forms of energy can be put in.
Potential and kinetic. Potential energy is stored energy, while kinetic energy is energy in motion.
Name the type of energy found in this spring.
The spring of a mouse trap holds potential energy. The potential energy is released when the mouse trap snaps shut.
Identify gravitational, chemical, nuclear, and elastic energy as either potential energy or kinetic energy.
These are all examples of potential energy, or energy that is stored.
Identify electrical, thermal, and radiant energy as either potential energy or kinetic energy.
These are examples of kinetic energy, or energy in motion.
Name the principle that states energy can neither be destroyed nor created.
The conservation of energy principle. While energy cannot be destroyed or created, it can be transformed.
Energy transformation
The process that energy undergoes when changing from one type to another. For example, a battery transforms chemical energy to electrical energy to power common household items.
Temperature
This measures the energy of molecules moving in a substance. The quicker they move the higher the temperature. The units for temperature are Fahrenheit, Celsius, or kelvin (scientific unit).
Heat
This is the sum of the energy that molecules in movement hold. This accounts for kinetic and potential energy of the molecules combined.
Name the three ways heat can transfer.
Conduction occurs when two objects touch. Convection occurs when hot air rises. Radiation occurs through electromagnetic waves.
Identify the label for a material that permits easy electrical energy transfer.
A conductor.
Identify the material containing atoms bound tightly to their electrons thus not allowing for easy transfer of electrical energy.
An insulator.
Identify the following examples as conductors or insulators: rubber, plastic, ceramics and glass.
These items are all insulators. They do not conduct electricity easily.
Electric circuit
The pathway on which electrons flow, these are created by connecting different components in a loop that holds a power source.
Identify the primary difference between alternating currents (AC) and direct currents (DC).
The direction of the flow of energy is the primary difference in these currents. Direct currents flow in one direction; alternating currents flow back and forth quickly.
Identify the circuit component noted here.
This is a resistor. This is the part of an electrical circuit that can lower electrical current to the desired level. All electronic devices have a resistor.
Force
A factor that will change the motion of an object. For example, gravity is an acting force when an apple falls from a tree.
Name Isaac Newton's law that establishes that an object continues in its state of rest or motion unless acted on by an outside unbalanced force.
This is Newton's first law of motion, the law of inertia.
Identify the following as contact forces or non-contact forces: friction, air resistance, applied force, tension force, and spring force
These are contact forces. These forces are all caused by objects physically interacting with each other in some way.
Identify the following as contact forces or non-contact forces: gravity (or weight), electric force, and magnetic force
These are all non-contact forces. These forces occur without objects coming into physical contact.

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