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Grammar Terms List & Flashcards

Grammar Terms List & Flashcards
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Group nouns, or collective nouns
Groups of people (usually) and things, but they are most often singular. For example, public, family, and company are collective nouns.
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Dangling modifiers
Words or phrases that describe something that is not in the sentence; the modifier is doing its job, hanging out, without getting any recognition! Sentences that start with gerunds (-ing words like having) are good places to look for dangling modifiers. For example, Having read the history book, the American Revolution started. To revise, add who's reading the book: Having read the history book, I know when the American Revolution started.
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Misplaced modifiers
Modifiers that point to the wrong part of the sentence, changing its meaning from what you intended. For example, the car was blue in the showroom. The adjective --blue-- is misplaced. To revise, move the word blue in front of the car: The blue car was in the showroom.
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Am, is, are, were, be, being, are known as _____ verbs.
'To be' verbs, which can serve as linking verbs or helping verbs in a sentence.
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Helping verbs
Verbs that come before the main verb, or the verb describing the action in a sentence. Helping verbs 'help' to complete the verb, by indicating the mood or tone of sentence or when something occurred in time.
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Conjunctions
Words that join words, phrases and sentences together.
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Pronouns
Words that replace nouns or other pronouns.
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Prepositions
Words that connect words and provide necessary details to sentences. There are over fifty prepositions in the English language.
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A period is placed at the end of the sentence. It is also referred to as a _____.
full stop
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FANBOYS
An acronym for remembering the seven coordinating conjunctions: For, And, Not, But, Or, Yet and So.
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Identify the verb in the following sentence: Jeff cut a slice of apple pie.
Cut is the verb in the following sentence: Jeff cut a slice of apple pie.
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Identify the nouns in the following sentence: Five cars slid down the hill.
Cars and hill are the two nouns in the sentence: Five cars slid down the hill.
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Subject
A person, place, idea, or thing that does something or is being something in a sentence.
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Adverbs
Words that describe or modify verbs.
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Adjectives
Words that describe nouns.
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Verbs refer to _____ words in a sentence.
action
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Nouns identify _____, _____, _____ or _____ in a sentence.
people, places, things or ideas. When you are referring to a specific person, place, thing, or idea, it is called a proper noun. Proper nouns are capitalized.
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Grammar
The parts of speech in language, and the use of those parts to form complete sentences.
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37 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers the basics in English grammar and writing. Everything in this set -- from the eight parts of speech, to the peculiarities in punctuation and the peccadilloes of parallelism; from the dangling and misplacing of modifiers to subject-verb agreement -- you'll come away with a better understanding of the English language and a fresh perspective on your writing style.

Front
Back
Grammar
The parts of speech in language, and the use of those parts to form complete sentences.
Nouns identify _____, _____, _____ or _____ in a sentence.
people, places, things or ideas. When you are referring to a specific person, place, thing, or idea, it is called a proper noun. Proper nouns are capitalized.
Verbs refer to _____ words in a sentence.
action
Adjectives
Words that describe nouns.
Adverbs
Words that describe or modify verbs.
Subject
A person, place, idea, or thing that does something or is being something in a sentence.
Identify the nouns in the following sentence: Five cars slid down the hill.
Cars and hill are the two nouns in the sentence: Five cars slid down the hill.
Identify the verb in the following sentence: Jeff cut a slice of apple pie.
Cut is the verb in the following sentence: Jeff cut a slice of apple pie.
FANBOYS
An acronym for remembering the seven coordinating conjunctions: For, And, Not, But, Or, Yet and So.
A period is placed at the end of the sentence. It is also referred to as a _____.
full stop
Prepositions
Words that connect words and provide necessary details to sentences. There are over fifty prepositions in the English language.
Pronouns
Words that replace nouns or other pronouns.
Conjunctions
Words that join words, phrases and sentences together.
Helping verbs
Verbs that come before the main verb, or the verb describing the action in a sentence. Helping verbs 'help' to complete the verb, by indicating the mood or tone of sentence or when something occurred in time.
Am, is, are, were, be, being, are known as _____ verbs.
'To be' verbs, which can serve as linking verbs or helping verbs in a sentence.
Misplaced modifiers
Modifiers that point to the wrong part of the sentence, changing its meaning from what you intended. For example, the car was blue in the showroom. The adjective --blue-- is misplaced. To revise, move the word blue in front of the car: The blue car was in the showroom.
Dangling modifiers
Words or phrases that describe something that is not in the sentence; the modifier is doing its job, hanging out, without getting any recognition! Sentences that start with gerunds (-ing words like having) are good places to look for dangling modifiers. For example, Having read the history book, the American Revolution started. To revise, add who's reading the book: Having read the history book, I know when the American Revolution started.
Group nouns, or collective nouns
Groups of people (usually) and things, but they are most often singular. For example, public, family, and company are collective nouns.
who/whom, whoever/whomever, whose, that, and which
Relative pronouns that can be used to create an adjective clause that describes something about the subject.
Relative pronouns
Pronouns that introduce relative dependent clauses.
Possessive pronouns show _____.
Possessive pronouns that show possession or ownership. The following are all the possessive pronouns in English: my, mine, your, yours, his, hers, our, ours, their, theirs and whose.
Reflexive pronouns
Pronouns that 'reflect back' on the subject of a sentence or clause. Singular reflexive pronouns include: myself, yourself, himself, herself, and itself; reflexive plural pronouns include ourselves, yourselves, and themselves.
-ing words are called _____
gerunds
A _____ is the same as an 'incomplete sentence.'
sentence fragment
Independent clause
A clause with at least one subject and one verb; it's the simplest sentence you can write. For example, 'we spent the money.
Sentence fragments usually lack either a main _____ or _____.
main verb or subject (or both).
Comma splice
A kind of run-on sentence, a comma splice occurs when a comma is inserted between two independent clauses without a coordinating conjunction to join them
The _____ is used to signify a slight pause in a sentence.
comma
Oxford comma or serial comma
A comma that punctuates, or places a comma before the last item in a series in a sentence. For example, Evelyn baked chocolate cupcakes with a mixture of four, baking soda, vinegar, and cocoa powder. in the previous sentence, the Oxford comma precedes the phrase 'and some cocoa powder.'
A punctuation mark that looks like two periods stacked on top of each other.
colon (:)
Semicolon
Connects two related independent clauses; connects transitional words and phrases within a sentence; and keeps items in a list that have separate internal punctuation.
Why is parallel structure important in a sentence?
Parallel structure impacts the style of a sentence.
Name all of the relative pronouns.
who/whom, whoever/whomever, whose, that and which
Which pronoun should be used only when introducing a clause that adds important and essential information to a sentence (called a restrictive clause)?
that
Name the relative pronoun that is used when you want to introduce a phrase that does not add important and essential information (sometimes called a non-restrictive clause).
which
In a sentence, it's important to be sure that your subjects and verbs match, or _____ ,with each other
agree
The following words can be identified as _____ verbs: could, should, does, will, have, had, might, shall, did, can, must, ought, to, would, might, do, am , is, are, was, were, be, being, been
helping

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