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Improving Essays Flashcards

Improving Essays Flashcards
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Active Voice
We use this kind of sentence when the subject performs the action. An example would be 'You wrote this sentence.' This makes sentences easier to understand.
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Passive Voice
You write a sentence in this way when you don't attribute action to the subject. An example would be 'The sentence was written by you.' This can lead to confusion.
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Run-On Sentence
This type of sentence has at least two independent clauses that aren't properly connected. These clauses can be properly hooked by a semi-colon or a comma and coordinating conjunction.
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Dangling Modifier

A modifier placed in the wrong location in a sentence, leaving ambiguity about whom or what the modifier is referencing

You should try to remove these from sentences to improve clarity

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Proofreading Strategies
You can read your essay out loud to complete this process. This makes small errors more obvious. You may also read backwards or make use of a computer's spellcheck tool.
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Proofreading
This is considered to be the last step in the process of revision. You complete this by looking for typos, words that are missing, misspellings and grammatical errors.
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Essay Purpose: Informing
You write this kind of essay when you just want to provide readers with information. Ensure you include facts that are relevant to fulfill this essay's purpose.
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Essay Purpose: Persuading
These essays are supposed to bring readers around to your point of view. You have to ensure your views aren't too extreme, and you need to support your stance with facts.
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Essay Purpose: Entertaining

Essays designed to tell a story that may be make-believe or factual

You can ensure these essays fulfill their purpose by looking at the development of your plot, conflict, characters and setting.

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Informal Essay

An essay that focuses on the feelings or thoughts of the writer

You may use first-person point of view and conversational language to write this type of essay

Got it
20 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Use these flashcards to review proofreading and copyediting strategies. You can go over the purposes of persuading, informing and entertaining essays. You'll also be able to focus on ways to avoid dangling modifiers, passive voice, sentence fragments and run-on sentences. These cards also address methods to ensure that you make use of parallel sentences in your work.

Front
Back
Informal Essay

An essay that focuses on the feelings or thoughts of the writer

You may use first-person point of view and conversational language to write this type of essay

Essay Purpose: Entertaining

Essays designed to tell a story that may be make-believe or factual

You can ensure these essays fulfill their purpose by looking at the development of your plot, conflict, characters and setting.

Essay Purpose: Persuading
These essays are supposed to bring readers around to your point of view. You have to ensure your views aren't too extreme, and you need to support your stance with facts.
Essay Purpose: Informing
You write this kind of essay when you just want to provide readers with information. Ensure you include facts that are relevant to fulfill this essay's purpose.
Proofreading
This is considered to be the last step in the process of revision. You complete this by looking for typos, words that are missing, misspellings and grammatical errors.
Proofreading Strategies
You can read your essay out loud to complete this process. This makes small errors more obvious. You may also read backwards or make use of a computer's spellcheck tool.
Dangling Modifier

A modifier placed in the wrong location in a sentence, leaving ambiguity about whom or what the modifier is referencing

You should try to remove these from sentences to improve clarity

Run-On Sentence
This type of sentence has at least two independent clauses that aren't properly connected. These clauses can be properly hooked by a semi-colon or a comma and coordinating conjunction.
Passive Voice
You write a sentence in this way when you don't attribute action to the subject. An example would be 'The sentence was written by you.' This can lead to confusion.
Active Voice
We use this kind of sentence when the subject performs the action. An example would be 'You wrote this sentence.' This makes sentences easier to understand.
Sentence Fragment

A sentence that isn't complete and can't stand by itself

This type of sentence is usually missing a clause.

An example would be 'this sentence'.

Parallel Sentences
Sentences that demonstrate balanced word usage and matching forms of verbs. For example, this means that if you're describing something and use an adjective, you should only use adjectives.
Parallel Sentences: Verb Forms and Tenses
You make sure that your sentences make sense in this way by using only one verb form when listing out actions. All your verbs should be in the same tense and form.
Parallel Sentences: Conjunctions
In order for sentences to be balanced, you must make sure that the words on either side of a coordinating or correlative conjunction match one another in type.
Peer Review: Copyediting
To do this, you look at a fellow student's work to ensure the paper handles its thesis, addresses the right audience and hits main points. You then provide feedback about needed changes.
Peer Review: Copyediting Changes
For the most part, you will offer feedback about suggested changes while completing this process. However, you may make some corrections to typos and grammar.

What is this an example of?

'Since John was running late for work, breakfast dishes were left on the table.'

Dangling modifier

We could change this to read: Since John was running late for work, he left his breakfast dishes on the table.'

Revise this sentence to be parallel:

'Sally likes to dance, go skating and exercise.'

'Sally like to dance, skate and exercise.'

Correct the following sentence:

'He enjoys playing sports more than movies.'

To make the sentence parallel, we would correct it as follows: 'He enjoys playing sports more than watching movies.'

What is incorrect about the following sentence?

'Mary had called John and told him about the party.'

The sample sentence is not parallel because there are two verb tenses used.

To correct this sentence, we could write the following: 'Mary called John and told him about the party.'

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