Interpreting Literature Flashcards

Interpreting Literature Flashcards
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Tone in Literature
The attitude that an author possesses about a certain part of their work. For example, if an author feels a dog should be scary, he or she would use words to make it seem frightening.
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Mood in Literature
This is the way you feel as you read some kind of story. Writers can develop this is by the way they describe the setting of their work.
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Elements of Literature: Setting
The location and time where a story is set. This aspect of literature can allow for interesting contrasts, depending on how it is used.
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Elements of Literature: Symbols
Writers use this literary element when they use one object to represent something else.
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Elements of Literature: Point of View
An element of literature that deals with who provides narration in the story. Stories can vary greatly based on the characteristics of the narrator.
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Elements of Literature: Plot
These are the things that happen in a story. When examining this literary element you can focus on how events are arranged, along with the use of flashbacks or foreshadowing.
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12 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

These flashcards can serve as valuable study tools to help you review the elements of literature, including structure, plot, symbols, setting and point of view. You can consider the distinction between mood and tone in literary works. You'll also be able to focus on the difference between a word's denotation and connotation. Additionally, these flashcards discuss inference and how it can be applied as a strategy when reading and interpreting literature.

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Elements of Literature: Plot
These are the things that happen in a story. When examining this literary element you can focus on how events are arranged, along with the use of flashbacks or foreshadowing.
Elements of Literature: Point of View
An element of literature that deals with who provides narration in the story. Stories can vary greatly based on the characteristics of the narrator.
Elements of Literature: Symbols
Writers use this literary element when they use one object to represent something else.
Elements of Literature: Setting
The location and time where a story is set. This aspect of literature can allow for interesting contrasts, depending on how it is used.
Mood in Literature
This is the way you feel as you read some kind of story. Writers can develop this is by the way they describe the setting of their work.
Tone in Literature
The attitude that an author possesses about a certain part of their work. For example, if an author feels a dog should be scary, he or she would use words to make it seem frightening.
Denotation
The literal meaning of a specific word. You would find this definition if you used a dictionary to look up a word.
Connotation
Meanings that are associated with a word, but that aren't part of its literal meaning. If you describe a nice person as a peach you are using this type of meaning of the word 'peach.'
Inference
A process that involves making observations and paying attention to background information to develop an understanding of things. It can be used in writing to determine a text's meaning.
Inference: Reading Strategy
If you pay attention to what you're reading and try to solve any mysteries in the text before the answers are revealed, then you are using this process as a reader.
Elements of Literature: Structure
The element of literature that controls the organization of the story and all of its other elements. Writers can use this to arrange their work in a way that adds meaning.
Epistolary Novels
These are novels that are written to resemble a diary, a series of letters or the entries of a journal.

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