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Language & Style in Public Speaking Flashcards

Language & Style in Public Speaking Flashcards
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Denotation
This is the definition of a word that would be included in a dictionary and includes other commonly used words for the same thing.
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Using diction for younger audiences
The words a speaker chooses should be simple enough for very young listeners to understand, and it is better not to use more complicated words that only adults may understand.
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Concrete diction
This type of diction involves use of language that gives the listeners concrete information about things like the dates of events.
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Connotative language
This language uses words to help the listeners understand that the speaker has observed something about them based on their reactions.
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Specific diction
This type of diction uses descriptive words and terms to help listeners envision what is being described. For example, the speaker could add words to describe how things look, feel or sound.
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Diction in a speech for a specific type of audience
If the speaker doesn't pick appropriate words, the group of listeners could have difficulty understanding the speech. For example, 5th grade students may not know what 'social constructs' are.
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How to prevent mispronunciation
You can tape your attempts to pronounce the words, you can practice repeating the words that are harder to pronounce, and you can think of the spelling of the words while you are saying them.
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14 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers topics from written and oral communication and the ways they are used to what type of diction to include in a speech for a younger audience. Learn about vivid language and how to include it to help a group of listeners to identify with the topics being discussed. Find out more about how and when to use formal definitions of words, or whether it is better to make comparisons to experiences and places instead.

Front
Back
How to prevent mispronunciation
You can tape your attempts to pronounce the words, you can practice repeating the words that are harder to pronounce, and you can think of the spelling of the words while you are saying them.
Diction in a speech for a specific type of audience
If the speaker doesn't pick appropriate words, the group of listeners could have difficulty understanding the speech. For example, 5th grade students may not know what 'social constructs' are.
Specific diction
This type of diction uses descriptive words and terms to help listeners envision what is being described. For example, the speaker could add words to describe how things look, feel or sound.
Connotative language
This language uses words to help the listeners understand that the speaker has observed something about them based on their reactions.
Concrete diction
This type of diction involves use of language that gives the listeners concrete information about things like the dates of events.
Using diction for younger audiences
The words a speaker chooses should be simple enough for very young listeners to understand, and it is better not to use more complicated words that only adults may understand.
Denotation
This is the definition of a word that would be included in a dictionary and includes other commonly used words for the same thing.
Written communication vs. oral communication
Written communication includes structured statements with clear descriptions, whereas oral communication tends to be informal.
Vivid language
This type of language creates a picture for the listener and describes things like scenery and noises and scents.
Descriptive similes
These are statements that make comparisons to other things to try to help listeners identify with an experience.
Difficulties using vivid, colloquial, or idiomatic language
Since all audiences may not understand certain terms and metaphors the same way, it can help a speaker to review information about the audience and geographic area beforehand.
General diction
This type is used to describe generalizations of things like locations and experiences. For example, a speaker may describe the wide variety of recreational activities available to a group.
Abstract diction
This type includes words and phrases that describe abstract things like thoughts, feelings and perceptions.
Metaphor
This takes two things that are not the same and attaches them to each other to create an interesting description of an experience or an event.

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