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Leadership & Conflict in the Workplace Flashcards

Leadership & Conflict in the Workplace Flashcards
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Leadership: Guiding Employees

You can accomplish this by defining the roles and duties of your workers. You should also give them the tools they need and be ready to participate in tasks, if necessary.

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Leadership Style: Authoritative

This style of leadership requires you to exert total control and to make all decisions on your own.

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Leadership Style: Participative

Your manager uses this style of leadership if he or she includes you in decisions while still making the final call.

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Leadership Style: Bureaucratic

This kind of leadership is very traditional. With this leadership style, you focus on obeying all your company's rules and fitting into your place in the chain of command.

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Leadership Style: Laissez-Faire

You demonstrate this leadership style if you trust your employees to do what they're supposed to do and you mostly stay out of the way.

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Leadership Style: Situational

Leaders with this kind of style will shift the way they act in order to better suit the employees they are currently working with.

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Informal Leader

This leader's power does not come from a position; rather, it is usually connected to charisma. This type of leader may serve as a role model as well as provide instruction and praise to others.

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Reward Power

Informal leaders use this kind of power when they use praise or other positive actions to get people to do what they want.

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Referent Power

Informal leaders have this kind of power when they are used as an example to lead others. If others imitate what you do, you have this kind of power.

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Formal Leaders

Individuals whose authority is derived from their position in an organization. CEOs are this kind of leader and they may be expected to work with members of other companies.

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Formal Leaders: Characteristics

First and foremost, these leaders must be appointed. Their power is governed by rules and is limited. The authority of their position allows them to interact with others.

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Workplace Conflict

This conflict that occurs among people in a business environment is caused by disagreements in their expectations or goals.

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Views of Conflict: Managed / Human Relations

You demonstrate this view of conflict if you see it as inevitable and believe that while having some conflict can be a good thing, too much conflict can negate any successes.

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Views of Conflict: Traditional

Managers with this view of conflict see it as something that can never be positive. They believe it is always a disruptive force.

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Views of Conflict: Interactionalist

If you have this view of conflict, you believe that it can sometimes be functional and sometimes dysfunctional. Dysfunctional can destroy groups, while functional can empower them.

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30 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards can help you review some common leadership styles, including:

  • Laissez-Faire
  • Authoritative
  • Participative
  • Situational
  • Bureaucratic

You'll also be able to consider formal and informal leaders. The traditional, managed and interactionalist views of conflict are addressed by this set of flashcards, along with the kinds of conflict experienced in the workplace. Additionally, you can consider a variety of conflict management styles, such as:

  • Avoidance
  • Accommodation
  • Competition
  • Collaboration
Front
Back
Views of Conflict: Interactionalist

If you have this view of conflict, you believe that it can sometimes be functional and sometimes dysfunctional. Dysfunctional can destroy groups, while functional can empower them.

Views of Conflict: Traditional

Managers with this view of conflict see it as something that can never be positive. They believe it is always a disruptive force.

Views of Conflict: Managed / Human Relations

You demonstrate this view of conflict if you see it as inevitable and believe that while having some conflict can be a good thing, too much conflict can negate any successes.

Workplace Conflict

This conflict that occurs among people in a business environment is caused by disagreements in their expectations or goals.

Formal Leaders: Characteristics

First and foremost, these leaders must be appointed. Their power is governed by rules and is limited. The authority of their position allows them to interact with others.

Formal Leaders

Individuals whose authority is derived from their position in an organization. CEOs are this kind of leader and they may be expected to work with members of other companies.

Referent Power

Informal leaders have this kind of power when they are used as an example to lead others. If others imitate what you do, you have this kind of power.

Reward Power

Informal leaders use this kind of power when they use praise or other positive actions to get people to do what they want.

Informal Leader

This leader's power does not come from a position; rather, it is usually connected to charisma. This type of leader may serve as a role model as well as provide instruction and praise to others.

Leadership Style: Situational

Leaders with this kind of style will shift the way they act in order to better suit the employees they are currently working with.

Leadership Style: Laissez-Faire

You demonstrate this leadership style if you trust your employees to do what they're supposed to do and you mostly stay out of the way.

Leadership Style: Bureaucratic

This kind of leadership is very traditional. With this leadership style, you focus on obeying all your company's rules and fitting into your place in the chain of command.

Leadership Style: Participative

Your manager uses this style of leadership if he or she includes you in decisions while still making the final call.

Leadership Style: Authoritative

This style of leadership requires you to exert total control and to make all decisions on your own.

Leadership: Guiding Employees

You can accomplish this by defining the roles and duties of your workers. You should also give them the tools they need and be ready to participate in tasks, if necessary.

Task Conflict

Employees experience this kind of conflict when they disagree about the goals or details associated with their work. An example could be two cooks disagreeing about serving potatoes or corn.

Relationship Conflict

Conflicts between employees that are caused by personal issues. These conflicts are difficult to address.

Organizational Conflict

These are conflicts that arise due to disagreements regarding issues in the workplace.

Process Conflict

You deal with this type of conflict when you can't agree about the specific steps you should take to accomplish something at work. Setting up written procedures can limit this.

Charismatic Leader

This kind of leader gathers followers based on the power of their personality. They have referent power and draw the focus of employees, which may limit company accountability in a negative way.

Robert Greenleaf

He came up with the idea of servant leadership, believing that effective leaders had to focus on servicing their employees instead of ruling through control, coercion or power.

Servant Leaders

Leaders who focus on helping their subordinates and others at all times. These leaders may be particularly interested in philanthropy.

Transactional Leader

These leaders believe that an employee's performance should be rewarded or punished and that compensation must be used to keep employees motivated. They often use management by exception.

Active Management by Exception

Managers that use this process will step-in to correct employees as soon as they make a slight deviation away from desired behaviors.

Passive Management by Exception

You use this management process if you only correct employees when they fail to fulfill your expectations.

Conflict Management Styles: Avoiding

You use this style of conflict management when you just try to stay away from the conflict. This could be useful if your participation will only make things worse.

Conflict Management Styles: Accommodating

Managers who use this conflict management style pretty much just let the other person have their way.

Conflict Management Styles: Collaborating

We see this style of conflict management when two people work together to come up with a solution that suits them both.

Conflict Management Styles: Competing

A conflict management style that occurs when a person is completely focused on winning and making sure the other party loses.

Maccoby and Studder

These individuals believed that conflict was emotional in nature and they advocated the taking of specific actions in order to prevent conflict from even occurring.

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