Literary Comparisons Flashcards

Literary Comparisons Flashcards
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Imagery
Writers use very descriptive language to create this, which provides all kinds of sensory information to readers to help them visualize what they're reading and to provide additional meaning.
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Simile
You use this literary device when you compare two things directly. You can generally recognize these by the inclusion of the words 'as' or 'like' in the comparison.
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Epic Simile
A kind of comparison that is stretched out. These were often used in epic poems, such as the works created by Homer.
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Personification
The act of writing in such a way that you attribute human characteristics to non-human things, including ideas, animals or nonliving objects. If you treat a concept as alive, you're doing this.
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Apostrophe
A literary device that allows a writer or character to speak to something that isn't alive or present as though it is. Poems addressed to gods or objects are using this.
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Flashcard Content Overview

Working with this set of flashcards can provide you with the opportunity to review metaphors, extended metaphors and mixed metaphors. You'll also be able to consider similes and epic similes. The distinction between apostrophe and personification will also be explored by these cards. You can access cards that focus on the definition of imagery and symbolism. Additionally, the difference between synecdoche and metonymy will be covered by this set.

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Apostrophe
A literary device that allows a writer or character to speak to something that isn't alive or present as though it is. Poems addressed to gods or objects are using this.
Personification
The act of writing in such a way that you attribute human characteristics to non-human things, including ideas, animals or nonliving objects. If you treat a concept as alive, you're doing this.
Epic Simile
A kind of comparison that is stretched out. These were often used in epic poems, such as the works created by Homer.
Simile
You use this literary device when you compare two things directly. You can generally recognize these by the inclusion of the words 'as' or 'like' in the comparison.
Imagery
Writers use very descriptive language to create this, which provides all kinds of sensory information to readers to help them visualize what they're reading and to provide additional meaning.
Symbolism
A device used in many literary works. It involves representing one thing, often something abstract like a life choice, with a person, an animal or some other type of object.
Synecdoche
We use this when we refer to a complete entity by one of its parts. For example, if you are talking about a car and you use the word 'wheels' to stand in for it, you are doing this.
Metonymy
If you refer to an object by something closely connected to it, you are using this. As an example, referring to a car as a ride would be an example, because cars don't have a part called a ride.
Metaphor
Writers make use of this literary device when they describe one thing as though it were a different thing entirely. If you write that your lips were a rose, you're making use of this.
Extended Metaphor
A specific type of metaphor that is drawn out to delve more fully into the connection between the two things that are being considered.
Mixed Metaphor
This occurs if you take two metaphors and blend them together. It's usually very confusing for everyone else, though it can be funny if you're trying to create a comedy.

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