Literary Symbols List & Flashcards

Literary Symbols List & Flashcards
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A story about a new and budding relationship might take place in the season of _____, to symbolize new beginnings and growth.
Spring
Got it

Identify which is the more common use of green color symbolism: to convey

A) wisdom and achievement, or

B) hope, youth, and possibility.

B) Hope, youth, and possibility.
Got it
Identify whether a 'black cloud overhead' is more likely to symbolize A) hope and promise or B) something bad or foreboding.
B) Something bad or foreboding.
Got it
The color most often used to symbolize blood or danger is _____.
Red
Got it
The color most often used to symbolize purity is _____.
White
Got it
A metaphor that extends throughout a literary work is called an _____.
Allegory
Got it

The child was a ball of energy, ready to explode.

The sentence above is an example of _____.

Metaphor
Got it
_____ is when an author uses one thing to represent another, such as a rose representing romantic love.
Symbolism
Got it
17 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Literature is full of symbols, which are used to convey meaning, heighten emotion, and help the reader to make connections between ideas. There are a number of frequently used symbols in literature including colors, seasons, objects, and use of light and dark. Review these flashcards to cover some of the most common symbols in literature, and to be able to recognize what they may represent in the literature you read and in your own writing.

Front
Back
_____ is when an author uses one thing to represent another, such as a rose representing romantic love.
Symbolism

The child was a ball of energy, ready to explode.

The sentence above is an example of _____.

Metaphor
A metaphor that extends throughout a literary work is called an _____.
Allegory
The color most often used to symbolize purity is _____.
White
The color most often used to symbolize blood or danger is _____.
Red
Identify whether a 'black cloud overhead' is more likely to symbolize A) hope and promise or B) something bad or foreboding.
B) Something bad or foreboding.

Identify which is the more common use of green color symbolism: to convey

A) wisdom and achievement, or

B) hope, youth, and possibility.

B) Hope, youth, and possibility.
A story about a new and budding relationship might take place in the season of _____, to symbolize new beginnings and growth.
Spring
A story about the end of a relationship, or the death of a main character, might by set symbolically in the season of _____.
Winter
The season most likely to be associated with aging, but not death, is _____.
Fall or autumn
To convey a sense of warmth and freedom, authors sometimes symbolically set their story in the season of _____.
Summer
If an author hopes to convey truth, identify which symbol they are more likely to use: A) light or B) dark.
A) light.
The red rose in Beauty and the Beast is a recognizable symbol for _____.
Romantic love.
If a character has a life-changing realization when it is raining, then _____ can be understood as a symbol for rebirth.
Rain, or water. Because water is often symbolized as rebirth, many 'aha!' or transformational scenes take place in the rain.
In a spiritual allegory, a ladder symbol might be used to represent _____.
Ascension, or a spiritual climb from earth to heaven.
Light, dark, letters, water, and seasons can all be used as _____ to represent other meanings in literature.
Symbols
Identify which color is most commonly associated with danger: A) red or B) green.
A) Red

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