Literary Terms Flashcards

Literary Terms Flashcards
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Verbal Irony

A type of irony that involves conveying an unexpected sentiment through spoken or written language

We can consider sarcasm to be a common example of this.

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Consonance
Writers work with this literary device when they repeat the sounds of consonants in their work. These sounds are often drawn from the beginning of a word, but not always.
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Assonance
This is a literary device in which the writer or poet forms rhymes by using the repetition of vowel sounds.
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Repetition

A literary device that is used extremely often

It involves using the same word or phrase over and over again.

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Equivocation
You use this when you mix one meaning of a word with a possible alternative definition. This often leads to arguments completely lacking in logic.
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Paradox
We use this term to refer to a contradiction that makes sense on the surface but falls apart when subjected to scrutiny. The book Catch-22 is famous for this kind of problem.
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Cliché

Any literary element that has been so overused that it no longer has much of an effect on readers

These feel unoriginal.

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Allusion
This term is used when talking about a reference made in a story to some other piece of literature, a historical event, a person or even a location.
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Illusion

A thing that falsely appears to be something else, tricking our senses

A mirage caused by heat could be an example.

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Allegory

A story designed to entertain and provide a lesson

They often represent figurative concepts, such as political or religious concerns, with physical things, such as characters.

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Parable
In an allegory of this kind, all the characters are humans. This kind of story still attempts to teach people a lesson.
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Fable
This kind of allegory is filled with characters who are either animals or some kind of objects. They are used to convey a lesson and are usually short.
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25 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You'll be able to focus on reviewing the definitions of fables, parables, allegories and tragedies with this set of flashcards. You can go over direct, subtle and symbolic foreshadowing as well as the use of red herrings. Verbal, situational and dramatic irony will be discussed. These cards examine the differences between illusions and allusions, along with consonance and assonance. Additionally, you'll be able to look at motifs, themes and thematic statements.

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Fable
This kind of allegory is filled with characters who are either animals or some kind of objects. They are used to convey a lesson and are usually short.
Parable
In an allegory of this kind, all the characters are humans. This kind of story still attempts to teach people a lesson.
Allegory

A story designed to entertain and provide a lesson

They often represent figurative concepts, such as political or religious concerns, with physical things, such as characters.

Illusion

A thing that falsely appears to be something else, tricking our senses

A mirage caused by heat could be an example.

Allusion
This term is used when talking about a reference made in a story to some other piece of literature, a historical event, a person or even a location.
Cliché

Any literary element that has been so overused that it no longer has much of an effect on readers

These feel unoriginal.

Paradox
We use this term to refer to a contradiction that makes sense on the surface but falls apart when subjected to scrutiny. The book Catch-22 is famous for this kind of problem.
Equivocation
You use this when you mix one meaning of a word with a possible alternative definition. This often leads to arguments completely lacking in logic.
Repetition

A literary device that is used extremely often

It involves using the same word or phrase over and over again.

Assonance
This is a literary device in which the writer or poet forms rhymes by using the repetition of vowel sounds.
Consonance
Writers work with this literary device when they repeat the sounds of consonants in their work. These sounds are often drawn from the beginning of a word, but not always.
Verbal Irony

A type of irony that involves conveying an unexpected sentiment through spoken or written language

We can consider sarcasm to be a common example of this.

Situational Irony
We see this type of irony when instead of an expected event coming to pass, the opposite occurs.
Dramatic Irony

A type of situational irony that occurs when the audience is aware of something the characters don't know

This literary device can be used to create humor or tension.

Thematic Statement
This tells us what message a writer is attempting to convey about a given subject or theme.
Motif
This term refers to some kind of concept or even an item that reappears multiple times in a literary work. If this is an object, it may be used to represent some idea.
Theme
A literary work's message
Catharsis
This occurs when we experience powerful feelings in response to a piece of literature, often resulting in the sensation of having your emotions cleansed.
Tragedy
A story that, according to Aristotle, should be performed and should incorporate substantial risks or consequences. Aristotle also asserted that it should give audiences a feeling of catharsis.
Direct Foreshadowing
In this type of foreshadowing the writer blatantly reveals what is going to happen in the rest of his or her work.
Subtle Foreshadowing
A kind of foreshadowing that doesn't directly give away plot points but that lends a story additional meaning upon re-reading
Symbolic Foreshadowing
A specific kind of subtle foreshadowing that involves the use of tiny details and imagery to drop minor clues about events that may occur later in a story
Chekhov's Gun

A plot element mentioned early in a story that turns out to have importance later on

This is also the idea that details shouldn't be included in a story unless they will come into play at some time

Red Herring
Clues placed throughout a story that are designed to make readers draw the wrong conclusion
Irony

This is when the opposite of what you expect to happen actually occurs.

There are several different types of this literary device that writers can use.

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