Literary Tone Flashcards

Literary Tone Flashcards
1/8 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Understatement: Example
An example of this might be if a hero gets hurt badly in a movie and he or she then says that the wound is only a scratch, downplaying its severity.
Got it
Understatement
We might consider this to be the reverse of exaggeration. It involves calling attention to a very obvious thing through the use of minimized language.
Got it
Euphemism: Example
When people say that a person who has died has 'passed away' they are making use of one of these in order to discuss a taboo subject.
Got it
Euphemism
If you are offended by a certain word, or if the term is considered taboo, you can use one of these instead. They convey the same meaning but are considered to be more proper.
Got it

Ready to move on?

or choose a specific lesson: See all lessons in this chapter
8 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can use the flashcards in this set as study tools to go over the definition of euphemisms. By completing these cards you can also consider the uses of understatement and sarcasm. These cards also address litotes. Furthermore, you'll find cards that provide examples of how all of these terms might be used.

Additional Study

Take the opportunity to continue expanding your understanding of literary terms related to tone by checking out some of these engaging lessons:

Studying with Flashcards

These cards can be accessed at any time and from any location, giving you a chance to control when you want to review the definitions of understatement and litotes. You can quiz yourself on the uses of euphemisms and sarcasm before you go in for a big test. Going over the examples of each term can help you keep them distinguished in your mind.

Front
Back
Euphemism
If you are offended by a certain word, or if the term is considered taboo, you can use one of these instead. They convey the same meaning but are considered to be more proper.
Euphemism: Example
When people say that a person who has died has 'passed away' they are making use of one of these in order to discuss a taboo subject.
Understatement
We might consider this to be the reverse of exaggeration. It involves calling attention to a very obvious thing through the use of minimized language.
Understatement: Example
An example of this might be if a hero gets hurt badly in a movie and he or she then says that the wound is only a scratch, downplaying its severity.
Litotes
A kind of understatement that involves using negative terms in order to emphasize your point to a greater degree.
Litotes: Example
You might find an example of this type of understatement in a novel if a terrible situation is described as 'not all that great.'
Sarcasm
This is a specific type of understatement that involves saying something that is the reverse of your actual meaning. This can sometimes be used as a form of humor.
Sarcasm: Example
If you say that you hate fries after ordering three plates of them and eating them all with all evidence of happiness you are employing this type of understatement.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support