Molecular Genetics Flashcards

Molecular Genetics Flashcards
1/19 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Mutation
This can be any type of change to the nucleotide sequences of an organism.
Got it
Deletion Point Mutation
Individuals with this kind of point mutation have at least one pair of nucleotide bases taken away from their DNA sequence.
Got it
Insertion Point Mutation
A kind of point mutation that takes place when an extra pair of nucleotide bases is added into an individual's DNA sequence.
Got it
Base Substitution Point Mutations
These are point mutations that occur if one nitrogenous base is substituted for another. Transition and transversion mutations are examples.
Got it
Amino Acids
These form chains that in turn form protein structures.
Got it
Point Mutation
These mutations are small and impact specific points in an individual's DNA, instead of a large area.
Got it
Silent Mutation
This point mutation occurs if a codon changes, but still results in the correct amino acid chain.
Got it
Missense Mutation
In this type of point mutation, a codon calls for the improper amino acid, which can lead to changes in the way a protein functions.
Got it
Nonsense Mutation
A kind of point mutation that ends up creating chains of amino acids that are too short. Proteins are not completed all the way in this kind of mutation.
Got it
19 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

These flashcards were set up to help you review the process behind the creation of proteins. You can focus on transcription and translation. Codons, nucleotide bases, amino acids, ribosomes and RNA will be covered. You'll also discover cards that deal with mutations and mutagens. Point mutations, including insertion, deletion and base substation mutations, will also be discussed.

Front
Back
Nonsense Mutation
A kind of point mutation that ends up creating chains of amino acids that are too short. Proteins are not completed all the way in this kind of mutation.
Missense Mutation
In this type of point mutation, a codon calls for the improper amino acid, which can lead to changes in the way a protein functions.
Silent Mutation
This point mutation occurs if a codon changes, but still results in the correct amino acid chain.
Point Mutation
These mutations are small and impact specific points in an individual's DNA, instead of a large area.
Amino Acids
These form chains that in turn form protein structures.
Base Substitution Point Mutations
These are point mutations that occur if one nitrogenous base is substituted for another. Transition and transversion mutations are examples.
Insertion Point Mutation
A kind of point mutation that takes place when an extra pair of nucleotide bases is added into an individual's DNA sequence.
Deletion Point Mutation
Individuals with this kind of point mutation have at least one pair of nucleotide bases taken away from their DNA sequence.
Mutation
This can be any type of change to the nucleotide sequences of an organism.
Mutagens
We use this term to refer to agents that are capable of causing mutations in organisms. These can be physical or chemical.
RNA
A nucleic acid that only has one strand of nucleotides. It holds the genetic code of a cell on the outside of the nucleus.
Protein
This large biological molecule is created from amino acid chains using instructions provided by an organism's DNA.
Ribosomes
mRNA and tRNA are used by this cellular organelle during the process of polypeptide assembly, which results in the formation of proteins.
Transcription
A cellular process that involves taking genetic information from an organism's DNA and copying it to RNA. Like translation, it has three phases: initiation, elongation and termination.
RNA Polymerase
This important enzyme puts RNA strands together according to the DNA template by using individual nucleotides. It's used in the process of transcription.
Antisense Strand
A DNA strand that is used during the cellular process of transcription. It acts as a template for transcription.
Translation
During this process, the code found within RNA is used to create a protein. Like transcription, it includes three steps: initiation, elongation and termination.
DNA's Nucleotide Bases

Adenine

Guanine

Cytosine

Thymine

Codons
This refers to sets of three bases that are found in mRNA. They are used to identify a specific amino acid.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support