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Narration & Point of View Flashcards

Narration & Point of View Flashcards
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First Person Point of View
A point of view used in the narration of some books. In this point of view, the narrator appears to talk directly to readers. An example of this would be the sentence, 'I did this.'
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Objective Narration
A kind of narration that just states the facts about what happens in a story, without bringing a character's opinion or emotions into play.
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Unreliable Narration
Narration that may not be completely truthful. This is provided by narrators who may be lying to themselves or the reader about what is going on in the story.
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Limited Narration
With this type of narration, the narrator tends to have all the information about one person, giving the reader a narrowed view of the world of the story that may be unreliable.
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Omniscient Narration
Writers who use this kind of narration provide information about everything happening in their novel, including a focus on the emotions and motivations of different characters.
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Flashcard Content Overview

Working with the flashcards contained in this set can give you the chance to review the differences between limited, omniscient and objective narration. You'll also be able to consider the uses of unreliable narration. These cards also focus on the differences between first, second and third person point of view. Types of literature that commonly make use of these points of view will be considered as well.

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Omniscient Narration
Writers who use this kind of narration provide information about everything happening in their novel, including a focus on the emotions and motivations of different characters.
Limited Narration
With this type of narration, the narrator tends to have all the information about one person, giving the reader a narrowed view of the world of the story that may be unreliable.
Unreliable Narration
Narration that may not be completely truthful. This is provided by narrators who may be lying to themselves or the reader about what is going on in the story.
Objective Narration
A kind of narration that just states the facts about what happens in a story, without bringing a character's opinion or emotions into play.
First Person Point of View
A point of view used in the narration of some books. In this point of view, the narrator appears to talk directly to readers. An example of this would be the sentence, 'I did this.'
Third Person Point of View
In this point of view, the narrator provides the information as an outside observer of story events. An example would be 'Bill and Jill did this.'
Second Person Point of View
We see this point of view when the lines between narrator and reader are confused; the narrator seems to speak directly to the reader. 'You did this,' is an example of this kind of point of view.
Third Person Point of View: Uses
This point of view is often used in literature. It is also considered the most appropriate point of view to use for biographical and academic writing because you aren't writing about yourself.
Second Person Point of View: Uses
Perhaps the most uncommon point of view used in writing, though you can find it in kids' books and instructions. An example might be, 'You then turn the oven on.'
First Person Point of View: Uses
You can use this point of view in literary works and it is considered appropriate for autobiographies, since the narrator is speaking about him or herself.

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