Parts of Speech Flashcards

Parts of Speech Flashcards
1/14 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Linking verbs

A type of verb that expresses being, sensing, feeling, or thinking. These verbs connect ideas in a sentence together.

Got it
Verbs
The part of speech responsible for telling us what nouns are doing or experiencing. This part of speech can express action or states of being.
Got it
Abstract nouns
One type of noun. These nouns are used to name things that are experienced through thoughts or feelings, such as 'joy' or 'liberty'.
Got it
Concrete nouns
One type of noun. These nouns can be directly experienced with the senses.
Got it
Nouns
Words that name anything you can see, hear, taste, touch, smell, or think. These include: people, places, things, feelings, and ideas.
Got it
Articles
Words that are not included in the eight parts of speech. The only words in this category are 'the,' 'a,' and 'an'.
Got it
Part of speech
A group of words categorized by how they function in a sentence.
Got it
14 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

The parts of speech can sometimes be a little bit difficult to identify in a sentence. But this flashcard set will make it easier to understand what a part of speech is and how the different parts of speech work together by performing their own special functions in a sentence. This flashcard set will also help you to identify and define the eight parts of speech and the jobs they do in a sentence.

For example, you'll learn about nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. You'll also learn about some of the subcategories of the major parts of speech. For instance, you'll discover the difference between concrete and abstract nouns, how to use linking verbs, and how to spot the parts of a prepositional phrase. Finally, you'll find out what three words make up their own special category known as 'articles'.

Additional Study

Want to learn more about the parts of speech and their functions? Check out the following lessons:

Front
Back
Part of speech
A group of words categorized by how they function in a sentence.
Articles
Words that are not included in the eight parts of speech. The only words in this category are 'the,' 'a,' and 'an'.
Nouns
Words that name anything you can see, hear, taste, touch, smell, or think. These include: people, places, things, feelings, and ideas.
Concrete nouns
One type of noun. These nouns can be directly experienced with the senses.
Abstract nouns
One type of noun. These nouns are used to name things that are experienced through thoughts or feelings, such as 'joy' or 'liberty'.
Verbs
The part of speech responsible for telling us what nouns are doing or experiencing. This part of speech can express action or states of being.
Linking verbs

A type of verb that expresses being, sensing, feeling, or thinking. These verbs connect ideas in a sentence together.

Pronouns

Words that are used in the place of nouns such as 'he', 'she,' 'it,' or 'they'.

Adjectives
Words, such as colors or numbers, that are used to modify or describe nouns or pronouns by providing more details.
Adverbs
These descriptive words often end in '-ly' and provide more details about verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.
Prepositions

Words that describe relationships between different nouns or pronouns. You can usually identify a preposition if it makes sense in this sentence: The rabbit jumped 'over' the log.

Prepositional phrases
Groups of words that begin with a preposition, end with a noun, and include any words that modify the noun. In a sentence these groups of words usually function as adverbs.
Conjunctions

Words that are responsible for maintaining 'intersections' in a sentence. These words show the relationship between different words, phrases, and clauses. Examples: and, but, or.

Interjections
Words that are unrelated to any other part of the sentence. These words interrupt the flow of the sentence, are often punctuated with an exclamation point, and express strong emotions or surprise.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support