Political Party List & Flashcards

Political Party List & Flashcards
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Polarization
A sharp division of two opposite extremes. Polarization is a challenge in two-party systems.
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A challenge of two-party systems is that the major parties can silence voices from the _____.
minority. It can very difficult for voices outside of the two major parties to be heard and taken seriously.
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A two-party system encourages _____ (moderate/extreme) views in order to appeal to a wide portion of the electorate.
Moderate. Because there are only two choices, each party hopes to appeal to as many voters as possible, which means that they tend to take centrist or moderate positions.
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Proportional Representation in a Multi-Party System
A form of a multi-party government in which parties receive a proportional number of seats related to the percentage of votes they received.
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Multi-party system
A political system in which the electorate can vote for a number of political parties
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The major American political parties are the _____ Party and the _____ Party.
Democratic and Republican
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The United States of America has a _____-party system.
two
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Two-Party System
A political system in which the electorate is voting to choose between two major political parties
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Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards explores two-party and multi-party political systems and takes a look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of each. It also explores third parties: what are they, and what role do they have in America's historically two-party system? Learn key terms (polarization, splinter party, and partisanship) that can help you think about the pros and cons of these political party systems.

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Two-Party System
A political system in which the electorate is voting to choose between two major political parties
The United States of America has a _____-party system.
two
The major American political parties are the _____ Party and the _____ Party.
Democratic and Republican
Multi-party system
A political system in which the electorate can vote for a number of political parties
Proportional Representation in a Multi-Party System
A form of a multi-party government in which parties receive a proportional number of seats related to the percentage of votes they received.
A two-party system encourages _____ (moderate/extreme) views in order to appeal to a wide portion of the electorate.
Moderate. Because there are only two choices, each party hopes to appeal to as many voters as possible, which means that they tend to take centrist or moderate positions.
A challenge of two-party systems is that the major parties can silence voices from the _____.
minority. It can very difficult for voices outside of the two major parties to be heard and taken seriously.
Polarization
A sharp division of two opposite extremes. Polarization is a challenge in two-party systems.
Partisanship
A strong bias towards one's own political party. In a two-party system, extreme partisanship can prevent compromise or action in government.
Between two-party and multi-party systems, _____ systems can better acknowledge the complex beliefs of each citizen.
multi-party. Voters have more choices in a multi-party system. In a two-party system, citizens may find that they disagree with both major parties.
Coalitions
Partnerships and alliances that are formed between parties in multi-party systems
Third Party
A political party that runs against the two major parties in a two-party system. In America, a third party candidate would run against the Democratic and Republican candidates.
Splinter Party
A party that 'splinters' off of a larger, pre-existing group. Typically there are particular issues or policies that the splinter party will disagree with.
Ralph Nader
A third-party candidate who ran in the 2000 American presidential race and whose candidacy brought attention to issues like the environment and corporate greed.
'Splitting the vote'
Though third party candidates often do not get enough votes to win elections, they can get votes that would have otherwise gone to the most like-minded major candidate, 'splitting' their votes.
Ross Perot
An independent presidential candidate who won a significant portion (18.9%) of the popular vote in 1992
the Bull Moose Progressive Party
A splinter group formed by Theordore Roosevelt in 1912. As leader of this group, he won the highest number of electoral votes of any third party presidential candidate.

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