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Post-Civil War Life in America Flashcards

Post-Civil War Life in America Flashcards
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'Separate but Equal'
A phrase the South used when talking about segregation. It led to the creation of sub-par facilities for black people kept apart from the better facilities used by white people.
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Southern Redeemers
This group attempted to take back both political and social control of the South, which for them meant bringing back slavery under a different name.
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Sharecropping
A system that involved landowners renting land and tools to freed slaves. Like convict leasing, this let rich white people take advantage of ex-slaves to provide agricultural labor.
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Convict Labor System
Like sharecropping, the social disruption following the Civil War drove this system, which involved enslaving convicts.
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Post-War Race Relations
People grappled with this in both the North and the South after the Civil War. Less violence is associated with fighting for civil rights in the North, but they still had problems with racism.
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Post-War Economy: The South
The economy in this area was devastated by the Civil War. The removal of slavery meant the entire economic system required restructuring.
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Post-War Economy: The North
After the Civil War, this area's economy was briefly affected by the higher taxes used to fund the military. However, it recovered quickly and then grew stronger.
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Civil War: Disease Death Rates
This killed more soldiers than anything else during the Civil War. Illnesses like typhoid fever, chickenpox, malaria and dysentery were very common.
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Civil War: Battlefield Death Rates
These were very high, largely because of advances in weaponry that either killed soldiers outright or left them with wounds that were prone to infection.
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18 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Working with these flashcards can help you review post-war recovery attempts for individuals, the economy and the land in the North and South. You can also consider sharecropping, the convict labor system and Jim Crow Laws. Court cases related to civil rights, including Plessy v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education will be covered by these cards. You'll also be able to focus on the Confederate Declarations of Cause and the 'lost cause' interpretation put forth to explain the South's actions in the Civil War.

Front
Back
Civil War: Battlefield Death Rates
These were very high, largely because of advances in weaponry that either killed soldiers outright or left them with wounds that were prone to infection.
Civil War: Disease Death Rates
This killed more soldiers than anything else during the Civil War. Illnesses like typhoid fever, chickenpox, malaria and dysentery were very common.
Post-War Economy: The North
After the Civil War, this area's economy was briefly affected by the higher taxes used to fund the military. However, it recovered quickly and then grew stronger.
Post-War Economy: The South
The economy in this area was devastated by the Civil War. The removal of slavery meant the entire economic system required restructuring.
Post-War Race Relations
People grappled with this in both the North and the South after the Civil War. Less violence is associated with fighting for civil rights in the North, but they still had problems with racism.
Convict Labor System
Like sharecropping, the social disruption following the Civil War drove this system, which involved enslaving convicts.
Sharecropping
A system that involved landowners renting land and tools to freed slaves. Like convict leasing, this let rich white people take advantage of ex-slaves to provide agricultural labor.
Southern Redeemers
This group attempted to take back both political and social control of the South, which for them meant bringing back slavery under a different name.
'Separate but Equal'
A phrase the South used when talking about segregation. It led to the creation of sub-par facilities for black people kept apart from the better facilities used by white people.
Jim Crow Laws
These laws worked against the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to restrict the rights of African Americans in a way that wasn't explicit.
Plessy v. Ferguson
A court case heard by the Supreme Court that presented the unjust 'separate but equal' ruling.
Brown v. Board of Education
In this court case, the Supreme Court finally declared that 'separate but equal' wasn't actually equal, allowing for desegregation.
John Wilkes Booth
The man who assassinated President Lincoln. He sympathized with the Confederacy and resented Northern interventions in the South, much like the Redeemers did.
Post-War Recovery: Location
This process mostly took place in the South, because the majority of the war had been fought there, resulting in tremendous amounts of devastation to Southern farms and cities.
Post-War Recovery: Wounded Soldiers
These individuals survived the war, but, depending on their injuries faced a lot of challenges. Many lost limbs, which made working difficult. They only had small pensions.
Confederate Declarations of Cause
Documents published by five Confederate states when they seceded from the Union. These stated that the states acted because of anti-slavery policies, not because of an abstract right.
'Lost Cause' Interpretation of the Civil War
A view of the war put forth after it ended. This claims that the war was about the right of states to secede, that it wasn't to protect slavery and that disadvantages cost the South the war.
Confederate Flag: 1950s-1960s
During this time period, individuals who were against the progress of Civil Rights adopted the use of this flag to defend segregation.

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