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Public Opinion & the American Civil War Flashcards

Public Opinion & the American Civil War Flashcards
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Election of 1864: Capture of Atlanta
The capture of this city by General Sherman renewed the North's desire to win the Civil War and positively influenced public opinion of President Lincoln.
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Election of 1864: Democratic Party
A political party that fractured in the election of 1864, leaving Peace Democrats and the Copperheads. They supported General George McClellan in this election.
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Election of 1864: War Democrats
This group of democrats supported a Northern victory in the Civil War and because of this they supported President Lincoln's reelection in 1864.
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The Emancipation Proclamation: Goals
This was designed to make clear the North's stand on slavery and as an attempt to encourage slaves to run away to the North, damaging the South's economy.
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The Emancipation Proclamation (1863)
A document that said that all the slaves in Confederate states were free and would always be so, definitively setting the Union against slavery.
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10 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards was created in order to serve as a study tool to help you review the public's opinion of the Civil War. You can consider how people responded to the Emancipation Proclamation and the draft. The political parties that developed during the election of 1864 will also be discussed, along with the effects of Sherman's capture of Atlanta on that election. Furthermore, these cards will cover the South's use of certificates of credit to raise money during the war.

Additional Study

You'll be able to continue building up your understanding of this period in American history by checking out some of these short, engaging lessons:

Front
Back
The Emancipation Proclamation (1863)
A document that said that all the slaves in Confederate states were free and would always be so, definitively setting the Union against slavery.
The Emancipation Proclamation: Goals
This was designed to make clear the North's stand on slavery and as an attempt to encourage slaves to run away to the North, damaging the South's economy.
Election of 1864: War Democrats
This group of democrats supported a Northern victory in the Civil War and because of this they supported President Lincoln's reelection in 1864.
Election of 1864: Democratic Party
A political party that fractured in the election of 1864, leaving Peace Democrats and the Copperheads. They supported General George McClellan in this election.
Election of 1864: Capture of Atlanta
The capture of this city by General Sherman renewed the North's desire to win the Civil War and positively influenced public opinion of President Lincoln.
Election of 1864: Effects of the Draft
Many Northerners saw this as an attack on their rights. It influenced many people to consider voting against Lincoln in this election.
Election of 1864: General George McClellan
This former Union general ran against President Lincoln in this election, along with George H. Pendleton.
General William T. Sherman
He captured the city of Atlanta late in 1864.
Certificates of Credit
The Confederacy used these to raise funds during the Civil War. They would take what they wanted and then provide people with these. However, these certificates proved to have no worth.
New York City Draft Riot
A riot that occurred in 1863 over unrest caused by the conscription process. The rioters took out their anger on innocent African Americans.

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