Copyright

Punctuation Flashcards

Punctuation Flashcards
1/15 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Run-on sentence
When more than one independent clause is in one sentence without proper punctuation
Got it
Sentence fragment
Incomplete sentence that lacks a subject and/or verb that create an independent clause
Got it
Non-essential elements
Words, phrases, or clauses that cannot stand alone without the rest of the sentence and are designated with commas or dashes on both sides
Got it
Comma splice
A comma separating two independent clauses
Got it
Oxford comma (serial comma)
Comma used to separate each item in a list, including the last item that comes after a conjunction word
Got it
Using commas with quotations
The comma goes inside quotation marks.
Got it
4 uses for a comma
Indicates a slight pause in a sentence, separates items in a list, sets introductions apart, separates quotations
Got it

Ready to move on?

or choose a specific lesson: See all lessons in this chapter
15 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

These flashcards will help you test your knowledge of key terms for grammar and syntax, such as pronouns and fragments. Various punctuation marks are defined and broken down by purpose - for example, three ways to use a semicolon and the arguments for and against using the Oxford comma. This set also covers the various types of sentences and sentence errors and also proper punctuation to correct them or make them easier to understand. Additionally, to help prepare you for example questions on the exam, several flashcards include incorrect sentences that require you to identify the error.

Front
Back
4 uses for a comma
Indicates a slight pause in a sentence, separates items in a list, sets introductions apart, separates quotations
Using commas with quotations
The comma goes inside quotation marks.
Oxford comma (serial comma)
Comma used to separate each item in a list, including the last item that comes after a conjunction word
Comma splice
A comma separating two independent clauses
Non-essential elements
Words, phrases, or clauses that cannot stand alone without the rest of the sentence and are designated with commas or dashes on both sides
Sentence fragment
Incomplete sentence that lacks a subject and/or verb that create an independent clause
Run-on sentence
When more than one independent clause is in one sentence without proper punctuation
2 main ways to use a colon
After an independent clause to introduce a list or provide further details
3 ways to use a semicolon

Joins related independent clauses

Connects clauses joined by transition words or phrases

Separates items in a list with internal punctuation

Identify the grammatical error: 'Though she had never met him he looked at her like he knew her.'

The sentence is missing a comma between 'him' and 'he'

Revised sentence: 'Though she had never met him, he looked at her like he knew her.'

Identify what could be added to enhance clarity: 'She went to the store for butter, milk, cheese and turkey sandwiches.'
To enhance clarity, an Oxford comma could be added between 'cheese' and 'and,' so we know she went for cheese alone and turkey sandwiches, not turkey sandwiches with cheese on them
Identify the error: 'She thought the class was: boring, uninteresting, and irrelevant.'

This sentence has incorrect colon usage because the phrase preceding the colon cannot stand alone.

Here is the correction: 'She thought the class was boring, uninteresting, and irrelevant.'

Identify the error: 'I love the library, the library is always quiet.'
This sentence contains a comma splice. To correct the sentence, these independent clauses can either have a period between them or a semicolon.
Identify the error: 'When it rained and got wet.'
Sentence fragment
Identify the error: 'His briefcase was full of boring, old paperwork, a bruising, yellow banana, and crisp, clean hundred-dollar bills.'
Semicolons should be used between each item: boring, old paperwork; a bruising, yellow banana; and crisp, clean hundred-dollar bills.'

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support