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Reading & Understanding Essays Flashcards

Reading & Understanding Essays Flashcards
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Context of a word or phrase
The other words or phrases surrounding it; the environment in which the word or phrase exists.
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4 steps to finding the gist of an essay

1. Ask 'what's the point?' throughout the essay

2. Foreshadow, guess where the essay is going

3. Explain the point in your own words

4. Critique and evaluate the main points

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Gist
Main point or essence; understanding the gist allows you to read more effectively and efficiently.
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2 steps to editing an essay
Editing for mechanics and editing for content.
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Peer-editing
Critiquing and editing another writer's work.
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How word choice can help you reach your target audience
Use the right language for your intended audience, such as technical terms for professionals or easy words for young adults.
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3 ways to determine the intended audience for a text

Word choice

Length

Layout

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Target audience
Readers for whom the writing was intended.
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17 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards will help you understand the strategies for reading and understanding essays, including the peer review process and key terms that will help you determine an author's meaning and intent. Terms such as target audience, gist, and word choice are included as well as the processes of editing for mechanics, editing for content, and understanding an author's intent. This flashcard set also covers the ways to figure out meaning through context when the meaning is not readily known. Use these flashcards to prepare for a test or use them to improve your skills in reading and critiquing essays by other writers.

Additional Study

For more on these terms and processes involved in editing, review the following lessons:

Front
Back
Target audience
Readers for whom the writing was intended.
3 ways to determine the intended audience for a text

Word choice

Length

Layout

How word choice can help you reach your target audience
Use the right language for your intended audience, such as technical terms for professionals or easy words for young adults.
Peer-editing
Critiquing and editing another writer's work.
2 steps to editing an essay
Editing for mechanics and editing for content.
Gist
Main point or essence; understanding the gist allows you to read more effectively and efficiently.
4 steps to finding the gist of an essay

1. Ask 'what's the point?' throughout the essay

2. Foreshadow, guess where the essay is going

3. Explain the point in your own words

4. Critique and evaluate the main points

Context of a word or phrase
The other words or phrases surrounding it; the environment in which the word or phrase exists.
4 tips to determining meaning through context

Look to known words for the gist

Pay attention to examples or details

Check for synonyms and antonyms

Substitute known words

Using synonyms and antonyms to determine word meaning
Use other words in the sentence to understand the gist. Pay attention to context to see if this word continues a thought or states the opposite.
Using substitution to determine word meaning
Replace the unknown word with a known word to see if it makes sense.
Audience
Anyone who reads the writing
3 questions when editing for content

Intended audience

Main points

Mood

Identify the gist: A college degree may benefit young adults as they begin careers; however, the exorbitant cost is prohibitive and large loans may prove financially harmful in the long run.
The cost of college or taking out student loans may not be beneficial to all career paths.
'Her gloomy attitude was an aberration from the usual cheerleader demeanor.' Define 'aberration' using the synonyms/antonyms method.
Aberration means a deviation from the norm.
'The drill sergeant was tough and unsmiling, her attitude was callous.' Define 'callous' by using other examples from the sentence.
Emotionally hardened, insensitive.
'The student was ambivalent, she couldn't decide if she should major in art or science.' Define 'ambivalent' using the substitution method.
Uncertain or having mixed emotions.

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