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Reasoning & Evidence in Essays Flashcards

Reasoning & Evidence in Essays Flashcards
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2 ways to evaluate a source

1. Timeliness

2. Author credentials

Got it
Secondary source
A source that restates information gleaned from a primary source.
Got it
Primary source
Original source where the information is found, often in the form of a speech, letter, or newspaper.
Got it
Deductive reasoning
The approach of starting with a conclusion then providing supporting details.
Got it
Inductive reasoning
The use of specific details that add up to a broad conclusion.
Got it
What to look for when evaluating reasoning
Evidence supporting claims
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13 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You may benefit from using this set of flashcards to review basic essay reasoning skills and terms. The set covers introductory steps to writing an academic essay, such as how to plan to write about a specific topic and how to choose the best writing tone for an audience. You may test your knowledge of validity, claims, premises and the different types of reasoning. This set also covers primary and secondary sources, how to evaluate them, and when to use them. And these flashcards include practice problems, such as asking you to pick the best source from a list of three possibilities.

Additional Study

You can learn more about rhetoric and reasoning in essays by reviewing the following lessons:

Front
Back
What to look for when evaluating reasoning
Evidence supporting claims
Inductive reasoning
The use of specific details that add up to a broad conclusion.
Deductive reasoning
The approach of starting with a conclusion then providing supporting details.
Primary source
Original source where the information is found, often in the form of a speech, letter, or newspaper.
Secondary source
A source that restates information gleaned from a primary source.
2 ways to evaluate a source

1. Timeliness

2. Author credentials

Which resource would be best to cite in an essay?: Yahoo Answers, Encyclopedia Britannica, or WebMD
Encyclopedia Britannica
The best way to support a claim
Statistics or facts agreed upon by two or more researchers.
2 steps for planning to write about a topic
Identify the purpose and the audience.
Tone (in writing)
Attitude conveyed
Best tone to use for an academic essay
A respectful tone will show you take the subject matter seriously.
Audience
The intended readers of an essay and an important consideration for all academic writing.
When to use a testimonial in an essay
Only use testimonials from experts in academic essays

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