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Researching a Speech Flashcards

Researching a Speech Flashcards
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Interview Preparation
Before you interview someone, conduct research on the area you want to talk about in your speech and to help you create targeted interview questions.
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Judging Source Reliability
To determine this, you must check that the information contained in the source can be verified elsewhere and that the information has been published recently.
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Source Bias
This happens when the writers have strong feelings about the topic about which they are writing and have difficulty being objective.
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Sponsoring Organization
This is the association that manages the website where the information is available. It can be an educational or government system or a company.
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Peer Review
This is the procedure scholarly journals and other publications use to have several professionals in the field review and evaluate articles before they are published.
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Judging Source Credibility
To do this, you have to find out what degrees the author holds and in what field they specialize.
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Credibility Criteria for Internet Sources
To use this resource, you must find out the author's name. You also need to judge the reliability of the site - for example, it does not incorporate a lot of pop-up ads and the links all work.
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Credible Sources
Sources, such as an article from a research journal or other scholarly publication, that provide verified, unbiased information to be included in a speech.
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Citing Speech References
At the end of the document, you can attach a list of all of the sources you used, known as a bibliography or the works cited, depending on the formatting style you use.
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Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers topics from how to incorporate information from sources that have trusted research to how to interview people who can give you information about their experiences that you use to enhance your speech. Learn about peer review and the methods used to verify that the material you are using in the speech has been reviewed by skilled people in the field. Find out more about the importance of providing accurate information to your audience by telling them about the authors and the organizations that published the research.

Front
Back
Citing Speech References
At the end of the document, you can attach a list of all of the sources you used, known as a bibliography or the works cited, depending on the formatting style you use.
Credible Sources
Sources, such as an article from a research journal or other scholarly publication, that provide verified, unbiased information to be included in a speech.
Credibility Criteria for Internet Sources
To use this resource, you must find out the author's name. You also need to judge the reliability of the site - for example, it does not incorporate a lot of pop-up ads and the links all work.
Judging Source Credibility
To do this, you have to find out what degrees the author holds and in what field they specialize.
Peer Review
This is the procedure scholarly journals and other publications use to have several professionals in the field review and evaluate articles before they are published.
Sponsoring Organization
This is the association that manages the website where the information is available. It can be an educational or government system or a company.
Source Bias
This happens when the writers have strong feelings about the topic about which they are writing and have difficulty being objective.
Judging Source Reliability
To determine this, you must check that the information contained in the source can be verified elsewhere and that the information has been published recently.
Interview Preparation
Before you interview someone, conduct research on the area you want to talk about in your speech and to help you create targeted interview questions.
Primary Resource
This resource gives a firsthand account of a person's experiences, such as personal research conducted or a diary or personal interview.
Secondary Source
This is information someone other than yourself gathered to include in a document; examples include books, newspapers, and statistical sources.
Supporting Materials: Accurate Information
Making statements that address only one part of an issue or problem may result in the audience reaching the wrong conclusion after the information is given to them.
Supporting Materials: Expert Testimony
This type of supporting material is declaration from a person who is a respected and trusted authority in a field of study or a professional in an industry.
Supporting Materials: Statistics
To present numerical information for a particular issue, converting the information into a diagram like a graph or table/pie chart is a good way to present it.
Oral Citation: Phrasing
You can let the audience know where you got the information by using an introductory sentence identifying the source, such as 'In X, the results of the study pointed to . . .'.
Oral Citation: Dates
Statements about the status of issues, such as a government report, should include dates to show that the information is current. A quote from a famous person does not need to have a date cited.
Oral Citation: Visual Aids
To do this, include statements, both verbal and labeled, to give the audience information about the source of your presentation chart or image.
Online Research: Keywords

Use short phrases

Combine different wording

Be creative

Use several search engines

Online Research: Commands

OR: finds information about either topic

*: used as a wildcard

-: ignores the word following it

+: searches words on either side together

Quotes: searches the exact phrase inside quotes

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