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Romantic Period in Literature Flashcards

Romantic Period in Literature Flashcards
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American Romanticism: Cities Include Moral Corruption
The idea that cities damage people morally was prevalent in this literary period. An example would be how Boston is represented in The Devil and Tom Walker.
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The Devil and Tom Walker: Moral
Readers of this story are instructed that they can be taken down a bad path if they give into greed or become morally corrupt.
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Coquette
A character who acts flirtatiously, such as Katrina in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
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American Romanticism: Wisdom from the Past
We see this theme in stories that value knowledge from the past. For example, characters in Sleepy Hollow are interested in hearing stories to gain wisdom or excitement.
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American Romanticism: Imagination
A theme of this period that is influenced by the Industrial Revolution. Characters who are prone to wild imaginings demonstrate this. The character of Ichabod Crane is a good example of this.
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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Ending
While there is some room for interpretation in the ending, based on the characters and actions the reader can infer that Crane was scared off by Bones pretending to be the headless horseman.
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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
This novel about a headless horseman by Irving is very famous. It embraces characteristics of American Romanticism, most notably a sense of wild imagination and supernatural elements.
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'Paul Revere's Ride'
A poem by Longfellow that fictionalizes the actions of Paul Revere. It embraces the American Romantic themes of finding wisdom in the past by being set during the American Revolution.
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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
A writer of the American Romantic literary period. His works often placed common people in the role of a hero, as seen in his poem 'Paul Revere's Ride.'
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18 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can work with these flashcards to review American Romanticism and its five major characteristics. You'll find cards that detail how Henry Wadsworth Longfellow as well as Washington Irving applied these characteristics in their writings. Specific cards address the stories The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, Rip Van Winkle, The Devil and Tom Walker and 'Paul Revere's Ride.'

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
A writer of the American Romantic literary period. His works often placed common people in the role of a hero, as seen in his poem 'Paul Revere's Ride.'
'Paul Revere's Ride'
A poem by Longfellow that fictionalizes the actions of Paul Revere. It embraces the American Romantic themes of finding wisdom in the past by being set during the American Revolution.
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
This novel about a headless horseman by Irving is very famous. It embraces characteristics of American Romanticism, most notably a sense of wild imagination and supernatural elements.
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Ending
While there is some room for interpretation in the ending, based on the characters and actions the reader can infer that Crane was scared off by Bones pretending to be the headless horseman.
American Romanticism: Imagination
A theme of this period that is influenced by the Industrial Revolution. Characters who are prone to wild imaginings demonstrate this. The character of Ichabod Crane is a good example of this.
American Romanticism: Wisdom from the Past
We see this theme in stories that value knowledge from the past. For example, characters in Sleepy Hollow are interested in hearing stories to gain wisdom or excitement.
Coquette
A character who acts flirtatiously, such as Katrina in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
The Devil and Tom Walker: Moral
Readers of this story are instructed that they can be taken down a bad path if they give into greed or become morally corrupt.
American Romanticism: Cities Include Moral Corruption
The idea that cities damage people morally was prevalent in this literary period. An example would be how Boston is represented in The Devil and Tom Walker.
The Devil and Tom Walker
This story is told like a legend, and based on a German legend, drawing on the idea of wisdom from past events. It focuses on a character becoming a greedy money lender and getting taken to hell.
Allegory
This is a literary device that involves representing ideas through a story's plot or characters. The Devil and Tom Walker uses this device extensively.
American Romantic Period
A literary period that began around 1830 and lasted until about 1870. It was characterized by imagination, individuality, wisdom from the past, common heroes and spirituality from nature.
American Romanticism: Common Man as a Hero
Writers in this period used common people as their protagonists. You can look at Ichabod Crane, who is just a normal guy, to see an example of this.
Washington Irving
A writer in the American Romantic period. He often used lofty language to convey irony, as when he mocks Ichabod Crane's singing voice in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
Diedrich Knickerbocker
The pseudonym, or fake name, sometimes used by Washington Irving
Rip Van Winkle
Irving's story about a man who falls asleep for 20 years. This story relies a lot on the element of imagination. In the story, city life is terrible, while nature is magical and amazing.
Imagery
The use of language to help readers clearly picture an object or setting, such as Irving's descriptions of nature in Rip Van Winkle
James Fenimore Cooper
The writer credited with creating the first American novel. The hero, Natty Bumppo, is a common American man.

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