Romantic Period Literature Flashcards

Romantic Period Literature Flashcards
1/13 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
American Romantic period characteristics

Spirituality in nature

Individuality

Escapism through imagination

Wisdom from the past

Heroes as common men

Got it
Ode to a Grecian Urn by Keats
This poem features the poet speaking to an ancient urn and describing what he sees on this object. It opens with the line: 'Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness,' a direct address to the urn.
Got it
Victor Frankenstein
A character in Mary Shelley's novel. This scientist created a monster with human parts and brought it to life.
Got it
Frame narratives
This literary device occurs when a writer sets a story inside of another story. Examples of works that use this device include Frankenstein and Canterbury Tales.
Got it
Jane Austen
A novelist who largely created comedic works that focused on social conventions. She wrote novels such as Pride and Prejudice and Northanger Abbey.
Got it
Edgar Allan Poe
This writer is sometimes referred to as the creator of modern detective fiction. His style of diction and usage of dark imagery contributed to this title.
Got it
13 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can access the flashcards in this set in order to easily review writers in the Romantic period, including Edgar Allan Poe, Jane Austen, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Mary Shelley and John Keats. Some of the major literary works of this period are covered, such as the novel Frankenstein and the poem An Ode to a Grecian Urn. Additionally, these cards focus on the unique characteristics of the American Romantic movement, especially the importance of individuality, escapism and spirituality in nature.

Front
Back
Edgar Allan Poe
This writer is sometimes referred to as the creator of modern detective fiction. His style of diction and usage of dark imagery contributed to this title.
Jane Austen
A novelist who largely created comedic works that focused on social conventions. She wrote novels such as Pride and Prejudice and Northanger Abbey.
Frame narratives
This literary device occurs when a writer sets a story inside of another story. Examples of works that use this device include Frankenstein and Canterbury Tales.
Victor Frankenstein
A character in Mary Shelley's novel. This scientist created a monster with human parts and brought it to life.
Ode to a Grecian Urn by Keats
This poem features the poet speaking to an ancient urn and describing what he sees on this object. It opens with the line: 'Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness,' a direct address to the urn.
American Romantic period characteristics

Spirituality in nature

Individuality

Escapism through imagination

Wisdom from the past

Heroes as common men

Escapism in American Romanticism
Writers in this period used this aspect of writing in an attempt to distract the mind by describing beautiful locations.
Individuality in American Romanticism
This appeared in American Romantic literature when characters would stay outside of mainstream society and follow their own rules.
Spirituality in nature in American Romanticism
An aspect of American Romantic literature that involved the belief that God could be found within the natural world
William Blake
A poet, engraver and illustrator from the Romantic period, his works sometimes included intentional anachronism and discussed God and worship and animals or those who worked with them.
William Wordsworth
An early Romantic poet who in many ways defined the movement. He believed that poetry should come from a 'spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings… recollected in tranquility.'
John Keats
A poet from the Romantic period who wrote many odes and asserted that 'beauty is truth, truth beauty'
Songs of Innocence poet
William Blake

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support