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Short Fiction Flashcards

Short Fiction Flashcards
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Informal Tone

A kind of tone characterized by straightforward language

Literary works with this tone may sound conversational

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Formal Tone
Stories that make use of this kind of tone are designed to seem fancier. This may involve using complex sentences and longer words.
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Dramatic Irony
A type of irony that occurs if a book's reader is aware of something to which the characters of the book are ignorant
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Theme
In literature, this is considered to be the main idea of a piece of writing.
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Tone
The attitude a writer takes to the subject matter he or she is addressing
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Mood
We use this term when referring to the way a piece of literature makes a reader feel. This can be affected by many things in a story, including the work's setting.
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Setting
The location where a story is set and the time period when it occurs
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Diction

A term used to describe the word choices used by a writer

These choices can be used to influence a story's tone, making things seem hopeless or hopeful, depending on their use

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Flashcard Content Overview

You can access this set of flashcards when you're ready to consider the differences between short stories, novellas and novels. The uses of setting, plot, characters and theme in short stories will be covered. You'll also be able to focus on diction, mood, conflict and character development. Additionally, these cards allow you to consider the definitions of formal and informal tone in literature.

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Diction

A term used to describe the word choices used by a writer

These choices can be used to influence a story's tone, making things seem hopeless or hopeful, depending on their use

Setting
The location where a story is set and the time period when it occurs
Mood
We use this term when referring to the way a piece of literature makes a reader feel. This can be affected by many things in a story, including the work's setting.
Tone
The attitude a writer takes to the subject matter he or she is addressing
Theme
In literature, this is considered to be the main idea of a piece of writing.
Dramatic Irony
A type of irony that occurs if a book's reader is aware of something to which the characters of the book are ignorant
Formal Tone
Stories that make use of this kind of tone are designed to seem fancier. This may involve using complex sentences and longer words.
Informal Tone

A kind of tone characterized by straightforward language

Literary works with this tone may sound conversational

Conflict

The major challenge or issue faced by the protagonist of a literary work

This can be shown in a variety of ways, including with dialogue between characters.

Plot
All literary works have this. It's everything that occurs over the course of a story.
Characters

The people who populate stories

Depending on the length of the story, writers may need to focus on only one of these.

Character Development
A process that involves looking at the elements that drive a character as well as the way that he or she grows over the course of a story
Short Story
We consider these literary works to be brief and able to be completed in one reading session. Many of Edgar Allan Poe's works are examples of this.
Novel

The longest kind of fictional work

Most publishers think these should be at least 70,000 words long; Pride and Prejudice is an example

Novella

A literary work that is longer than a short story but not as long as a novel

An example of this would be Heart of Darkness.

Dialogue

Characters take part in this when they speak to each other

Readers can know they have come across this literary device when they see text enclosed in quotation marks

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