Slavery in the Early United States Flashcards

Slavery in the Early United States Flashcards
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Eli Whitney
He created the cotton gin, an invention that served to further support the use of slavery in the South.
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William Lloyd Garrison
An abolitionist who tried to end slavery by publishing a lot of pamphlets and newspapers.
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Nat Turner
He led a slave revolt in Virginia. His uprising was the largest to occur prior to the Civil War.
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Slavery: Reasons Africans were Enslaved

Disease immunity

Low chances they'd escape

Experience with rice and sugar production

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Slave Codes: Effects on the North
These codes angered Northern abolitionists because they brought the practice of slavery into Northern states by allowing slave owners to punish slaves who escaped to the North.
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Slave Codes
Codes passed in the South to protect the rights of slave owners and to dictate how slaves should behave. The South created these out of fear of slave revolts.
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George Washington: Position on Slavery
This Founding Father, our first President, inherited and owned slaves. However, he supported emancipation and freed his slaves after his wife died.
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Benjamin Franklin: Position on Slavery
This man, who ran The Philadelphia Gazette newspaper, turned into an abolitionist and even served as president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.
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Thomas Jefferson: Position on Slavery
He had a very ambiguous position on slaves. He wrote the Declaration of Independence, owned hundreds of slaves, probably had a sexual relationship with one and supported gradual emancipation.
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Founding Fathers: Non-Slave Owners
Many of the founding fathers never owned slaves and were in favor of abolition. Examples include both John and Samuel Adams as well as Alexander Hamilton.
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20 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Use these flashcards as study tools to review the views of Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Samuel Adams, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton on slavery. You'll be able to consider the South's slave codes and the three-fifths compromise. The reasons Africans were enslaved will also be discussed, along with the impact of the cotton gin on slavery. Additionally, these cards address how the Constitution deals with slavery.

Front
Back
Founding Fathers: Non-Slave Owners
Many of the founding fathers never owned slaves and were in favor of abolition. Examples include both John and Samuel Adams as well as Alexander Hamilton.
Thomas Jefferson: Position on Slavery
He had a very ambiguous position on slaves. He wrote the Declaration of Independence, owned hundreds of slaves, probably had a sexual relationship with one and supported gradual emancipation.
Benjamin Franklin: Position on Slavery
This man, who ran The Philadelphia Gazette newspaper, turned into an abolitionist and even served as president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.
George Washington: Position on Slavery
This Founding Father, our first President, inherited and owned slaves. However, he supported emancipation and freed his slaves after his wife died.
Slave Codes
Codes passed in the South to protect the rights of slave owners and to dictate how slaves should behave. The South created these out of fear of slave revolts.
Slave Codes: Effects on the North
These codes angered Northern abolitionists because they brought the practice of slavery into Northern states by allowing slave owners to punish slaves who escaped to the North.
Slavery: Reasons Africans were Enslaved

Disease immunity

Low chances they'd escape

Experience with rice and sugar production

Nat Turner
He led a slave revolt in Virginia. His uprising was the largest to occur prior to the Civil War.
William Lloyd Garrison
An abolitionist who tried to end slavery by publishing a lot of pamphlets and newspapers.
Eli Whitney
He created the cotton gin, an invention that served to further support the use of slavery in the South.
Missouri Compromise
A compromise used to determine which new states would be free and which would be slave owning. It began with the admission of Missouri as a slave state and Maine as a free state.
Indentured Servitude
A practice that allowed people to pay for their travel to the Americas by acting as a servant for a given period of time.
Slavery: Economic Importance
This practice proved to be very important to the Southern economy because half of the exports sold by the South came from cotton, which relied on it.
U.S. Constitution: Slavery Protections
This document was influenced by a desire to keep slavery as a state issue. Worries about drops in the South's economic input and economic losses influenced this document's view of slavery.
U.S. Constitution: Impact of Economics on Slavery
Because the South was powerful economically when this document was drafted, it was able to force a tacit approval for slavery from the North.
Slavery: Factors that Increased Tensions
The expanding size of the nation and increases in population and wealth led to increasing tensions related to this practice.
Northwest Ordinance
This act set up rules for how the Northwest Territory should be governed. It was heavily influenced by Thomas Jefferson. It outlawed slavery in this territory.
Three-Fifths Compromise
A plan set up to determine how slaves would be counted for the purposes of taxation and representation. It said that slaves were to be considered three-fifths of a person.
Articles of Confederation: Taxation
Under this document, taxation was to be based on land value, not on the number of people in a state.
Gradual Emancipation
A view that held that the abolishment of slavery should take place in stages, with slaves being deported out of concerns that an interracial society wouldn't be peaceful.

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