Social Psychology Flashcards

Social Psychology Flashcards
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Social psychology
The study of how we understand our place in the world; looks at how we perceive things, our attitudes, and our interactions
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Social identity
Membership in a particular group or groups which determines the things we do every day
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The 3 theories that explain the formation of prejudice
Social learning (learned from those around you); motivational theory (you see others as your competition); personality theory (prejudice arise from personal experience during your development)
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Stereotype
A judgement a person makes that allows them to decide how to respond in a given situation by comparing new information to past experience
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External explanations for aggression
Frustration-aggression hypothesis; watching others be aggressive can lead to social learning of the behavior; inflated or very poor self-esteem can lead people to act out with aggression
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Biological explanations for aggression
A predisposition due to genetics; elevated testosterone; damage to the brain's frontal lobe
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Aggression
Committing an act of violence against someone with the specific intent to do harm to them
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15 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers all of the important concepts and terms needed for a thorough understanding of social psychology. Some of the information you'll review includes social identity, stereotypes, norms, self-serving bias, and groupthink. Psychologist such as Robert Sternberg and Robert Zajonc are discussed, and their important theories are explained. Important information about biological and environmental factors in aggression, attraction, and group behavior is also explained.

Front
Back
Aggression
Committing an act of violence against someone with the specific intent to do harm to them
Biological explanations for aggression
A predisposition due to genetics; elevated testosterone; damage to the brain's frontal lobe
External explanations for aggression
Frustration-aggression hypothesis; watching others be aggressive can lead to social learning of the behavior; inflated or very poor self-esteem can lead people to act out with aggression
Stereotype
A judgement a person makes that allows them to decide how to respond in a given situation by comparing new information to past experience
The 3 theories that explain the formation of prejudice
Social learning (learned from those around you); motivational theory (you see others as your competition); personality theory (prejudice arise from personal experience during your development)
Social identity
Membership in a particular group or groups which determines the things we do every day
Social psychology
The study of how we understand our place in the world; looks at how we perceive things, our attitudes, and our interactions
Drive theory
Theory developed by Robert Zajonc; says your performance will be improved by the presence of others when a task is easy, but during a difficult task, the this can lead to social loafing
Groupthink
The phenomenon of a group to trend towards consensus rather than dealing with conflict to come to a solution
Normative conformity
Behaving according to expected social norms
The self-serving bias
Our tendency to attribute our successes to things that we have done, but blame our failures on things out of our control
The fundamental attribution error
Blaming internal behaviors for issues; blaming people over situations
The just world hypothesis
The concept that people 'get what they deserve'; blames the victim rather than other, external factors
The triangular model of love
Theorized by Robert Sternberg; says that the three aspects of love are passion, intimacy, and commitment
How attractiveness is determined
What is considered attractive varies by culture based on what a given culture views as important and what status is important in that culture

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