Source Materials for Research Papers Flashcards

Source Materials for Research Papers Flashcards
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Evaluating a Source
To do this you should examine the source's reliability as well as its purpose and the author's authority.
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Sources: Reliability
This refers to how much you can trust a source. Sources that were created recently and that have gone through peer review while presenting an unbiased argument have this.
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Blogs
These are online journals that focus on an individual's experiences and opinions. They aren't considered scholarly because they aren't created by experts.
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Finding an Academic Source
You can usually find these through aggregated databases, though they may give you lots of results. Tighten your search through the use of keywords to locate what you need.
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Aggregated Database
Online collections of academic sources. You can access these while researching for a paper. Examples include EBSCO & ProQuest.
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Academic / Scholarly Sources
A specific kind of source that is peer-reviewed, created by an expert, published reputably and supported by references. These sources are considered trustworthy and can include books & articles.
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Peer-Reviewed Sources
Experts in a given topic create these sources, which are then reviewed for accuracy and quality by other experts in the same field.
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15 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

These flashcards cover academic and peer-reviewed sources. The differences between primary and secondary sources will also be discussed. You can focus on the uses of aggregated databases. You'll also be able to review methods to determine the reliability, authority and purpose of a source.

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Peer-Reviewed Sources
Experts in a given topic create these sources, which are then reviewed for accuracy and quality by other experts in the same field.
Academic / Scholarly Sources
A specific kind of source that is peer-reviewed, created by an expert, published reputably and supported by references. These sources are considered trustworthy and can include books & articles.
Aggregated Database
Online collections of academic sources. You can access these while researching for a paper. Examples include EBSCO & ProQuest.
Finding an Academic Source
You can usually find these through aggregated databases, though they may give you lots of results. Tighten your search through the use of keywords to locate what you need.
Blogs
These are online journals that focus on an individual's experiences and opinions. They aren't considered scholarly because they aren't created by experts.
Sources: Reliability
This refers to how much you can trust a source. Sources that were created recently and that have gone through peer review while presenting an unbiased argument have this.
Evaluating a Source
To do this you should examine the source's reliability as well as its purpose and the author's authority.
Sources: Purpose
You can determine what this is by looking at a source's goal and target audience. You should also consider if it displays an obvious opinion, as this indicates bias.
Sources: Authority
Check this by finding out who created the source and determining if he or she is an expert. You should also check for the inclusion of citations that support the source's claims.
Primary Source
This represents the first place where you can find a piece of information. Eyewitness accounts are examples of this kind of source.
Secondary Source
A source that draws conclusions based on pre-existing information or data. Peer-reviewed articles might be an example of this.
Citing Sources
You need to complete this process on all sources you use in your research. This includes sources that don't support your idea and sources that confirm what you thought.
Sources: Verifiability
Assess sources for this by researching the author to see if he or she is an expert on the topic. This may involve conducting an online search to see if the writer has a relevant degree.
Unbiased Source
This kind of source presents every aspect of a topic fairly by making sure to stick to reporting the facts. The creators of these sources are up front about any of their opinions.
Sources: Conflicting Information
You can deal with situations where the information you find doesn't match up by trying to find additional verifiable sources that cover the facts you're researching.

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