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Space & the Solar System Flashcards

Space & the Solar System Flashcards
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Temperature of the spectral class of K-type stars
3,700-5,200 kelvin
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Temperature of the spectral class of G-type stars
5,200-6,000 kelvin
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Temperature of the spectral class of F-type stars
6,000-7,500 kelvin
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Temperature of the spectral class of A-type stars
7,500-10,000 kelvin
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Temperature of the spectral class of B-type stars
10,000-33,000 kelvin
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Temperature of the spectral class of O-type stars
Equal to or greater than 33,000 kelvin
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White dwarf
The final or 'death' stage of a low or medium-mass star the occurs once the star can no longer undergo nuclear fusion at its core. This will be the final stage of our sun.
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Main sequence star
A star that is in the process of nuclear fusion. The star is stable due to a balance between the internal fusion at the core and the force of the external gravity. This is the current stage of our sun.
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Terrestrial planets
Small, dense, rocky planets with few natural satellites
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Gas giants in our solar system
Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune
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Terrestrial planets in our solar system
Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars
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Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards can help you study a variety of information about our solar system, the lifespan of a star, and the origins of the universe. You can review the difference between terrestrial planets and gas giants, various stages of a star, and the temperature ranges of each classification type on the spectral code. You can also review the age of the universe, the earliest particles to appear in the universe, and how stars generate their energy for nuclear fusion.

Front
Back
Terrestrial planets in our solar system
Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars
Gas giants in our solar system
Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune
Terrestrial planets
Small, dense, rocky planets with few natural satellites
Main sequence star
A star that is in the process of nuclear fusion. The star is stable due to a balance between the internal fusion at the core and the force of the external gravity. This is the current stage of our sun.
White dwarf
The final or 'death' stage of a low or medium-mass star the occurs once the star can no longer undergo nuclear fusion at its core. This will be the final stage of our sun.
Temperature of the spectral class of O-type stars
Equal to or greater than 33,000 kelvin
Temperature of the spectral class of B-type stars
10,000-33,000 kelvin
Temperature of the spectral class of A-type stars
7,500-10,000 kelvin
Temperature of the spectral class of F-type stars
6,000-7,500 kelvin
Temperature of the spectral class of G-type stars
5,200-6,000 kelvin
Temperature of the spectral class of K-type stars
3,700-5,200 kelvin
Temperature of the spectral class of M-type stars
2,000-3,700 kelvin
The first things to form after the Big Bang
Protons, neutrons, and electrons
Estimated age of the universe based on the Big Bang Theory
13.7 billion years
Protostar
An early stage in a star's life cycle when it doesn't have the heat or mass to begin nuclear fusion.
Brown dwarf
A protostar that never became large and hot enough to begin nuclear fusion
The main source of fuel for a star's nuclear fusion process
Hydrogen, which is turned into helium through nuclear fusion
Spiral galaxy
A galaxy made up of multiple 'arms' that form a spiral. These galaxies are thin, disk-shaped, dense, and rotate at high speeds.
Gas giants
Large planets composed almost entirely of gas, as well as a core that is solid
Red giant

The stage of a low or medium-mass star's life cycle following the main sequence. At this stage, the star's core collapses and the heat causes the star to greatly expand. This is the later stage of a star's life.

Elliptical galaxy
Type of galaxy that is oftentimes spherical and/or bulky where stars are in random orbit.
Irregular galaxy
This galaxy type doesn't have symmetric structure and can be described as deformed. These include a small portion of known galaxies.

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