Speech Delivery & Evaluation Flashcards

Speech Delivery & Evaluation Flashcards
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How to evaluate a speech given by another person
Try to figure out what led to the speaker choosing the main points included in the speech, and ask yourself whether you find the speaker credible and believe the information presented.
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Crossing your arms while giving a speech
This gesture gives the audience the impression that you are not enthusiastic about the speech or that you are not at ease while giving the speech.
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Arched eyebrows during a speech
This facial expression indicates that you are shocked about something or that you have a hard time accepting that something is true.
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Communicating with your audience using body language
To make your speech better, keep looking at the audience members, put a pleasant expression on your face, and move your hands to emphasize what you are saying.
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How to handle a question you are not prepared for

Answer positively and minimize your lack of knowledge

E.g., Tell the audience you aren't sure about the answer at the moment but will make a note of their question and get the answer for them.

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Being prepared to take questions before speech day
You can try to give the speech to close relatives or acquaintances beforehand, and this can help you to identify what types of questions the real audience might have.
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Manuscript speeches
For this type, the speaker has the speech already written and reads from the document. This type of speech can be helpful if the speaker has a hard time presenting the speech from memory.
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Extemporaneous speeches
To deliver this type of speech, a speaker creates notes that he or she can glance at to remember key points. The speaker talks freely rather than reading from a script.
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Impromptu speeches
This type of speech is given at an event where the speaker says a few words without planning the speech or writing the speech beforehand, such as at a birthday party.
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Vocal traits
These are a person's habits and patterns of speech, including certain phrasing, pronunciations, and accents.
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Keeping dialect in mind
When preparing to give a speech a speaker has to keep in mind that the language and slang used by people in a geographic area may be different.
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23 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers the goals that a speaker can set when preparing a speech. Additionally, brush up on the body language a speaker can use to keep audience members comfortable and engaged. Learn about how to include verifiable and valuable information in a speech and how to avoid including too much information that can sway the audience emotionally. Also, find out more about rehearsing beforehand to critique yourself and make improvements before you give the formal presentation.

Front
Back
Keeping dialect in mind
When preparing to give a speech a speaker has to keep in mind that the language and slang used by people in a geographic area may be different.
Vocal traits
These are a person's habits and patterns of speech, including certain phrasing, pronunciations, and accents.
Impromptu speeches
This type of speech is given at an event where the speaker says a few words without planning the speech or writing the speech beforehand, such as at a birthday party.
Extemporaneous speeches
To deliver this type of speech, a speaker creates notes that he or she can glance at to remember key points. The speaker talks freely rather than reading from a script.
Manuscript speeches
For this type, the speaker has the speech already written and reads from the document. This type of speech can be helpful if the speaker has a hard time presenting the speech from memory.
Being prepared to take questions before speech day
You can try to give the speech to close relatives or acquaintances beforehand, and this can help you to identify what types of questions the real audience might have.
How to handle a question you are not prepared for

Answer positively and minimize your lack of knowledge

E.g., Tell the audience you aren't sure about the answer at the moment but will make a note of their question and get the answer for them.

Communicating with your audience using body language
To make your speech better, keep looking at the audience members, put a pleasant expression on your face, and move your hands to emphasize what you are saying.
Arched eyebrows during a speech
This facial expression indicates that you are shocked about something or that you have a hard time accepting that something is true.
Crossing your arms while giving a speech
This gesture gives the audience the impression that you are not enthusiastic about the speech or that you are not at ease while giving the speech.
How to evaluate a speech given by another person
Try to figure out what led to the speaker choosing the main points included in the speech, and ask yourself whether you find the speaker credible and believe the information presented.
How to know if a speaker is trustworthy
You can check the speaker's sources to see if they are reliable and you can also consider when the source information was written and who wrote it.
First-person observations in speech
If a speaker uses other people's accounts of their experiences but doesn't include examples from personal knowledge, they are probably giving a speech on things they haven't experienced.
Puffery in speech
This happens when a speaker includes material that can stir up feelings in the audience members and uses colorful words and phrases more than material that will inform.
Self-inventory for speakers
This is the process speakers use to assess their own delivery of a speech to determine if they presented the information effectively and in such a way that the audience could grasp it.
Measurable goals in a speech
These are standards that you set for yourself when preparing a speech and include the points that you have to make during the speech to explain something or teach or inform the audience.
Specific goals in a speech
These are goals related to the speech as a whole and are normally presented clearly as the problem the speaker wants to address. If the speaker addresses the problem, the speech is successful.
Way to evaluate your speech after you present it
You can ask the people who attended the speech to answer a number of questions that you can include in a survey.
Overcoming anxiety when you deliver a speech
You can try to get an idea of how you will appear to the audience by making a video recording of yourself to take a look at your poise and to hear the sound of your voice during the speech.
Articulation
This is what we do when we actually say words out loud and try to make the appropriate and expected sound for each part of the word.
Memorized speech
This type of speech is given by a speaker who recalls the speech from memory. This allows the speaker to present the speech without looking at note cards or reading from a script.
Inferences
These are ideas that people can draw about events or information, which can lead to certain conclusions.
Critical thinking to determine what the speaker's goal is
People evaluate a speech to figure out what the purpose of the speech is. For example, a speech about how helpful a product or service is may try to get you to purchase something.

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