States of Consciousness in Psychology Flashcards

States of Consciousness in Psychology Flashcards
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The person is considered in a different mental state without being unconscious. This different mental state can be produced intentionally, accidentally, or from an illness.
Altered States of Consciousness
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_____ behaviors are unconscious.
Automatic
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_____ behaviors are conscious.
Deliberate
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Daydreaming is an example of an _____.
Altered State of Consciousness
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He believed unconscious factors influence our conscious behaviors.
Sigmund Freud
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Individual perception of self and how we act in our environments.
Consciousness
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Being cognizant that you exist individually and separate from society.
Self-Awareness
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Flashcard Content Overview

Why did I say that? Why did I do that? Our conscious and unconscious desires affect how we think, feel, and act. In addition to conscious and unconscious behaviors, there are altered states of consciousness that also affect how we think, feel, and act. For example, most people have experienced dreams where they are falling or flying. The feelings associated with these types of dreams can be felt during the dreams and when you suddenly awake; therefore, affecting how you may think, feel, or act.

People experience altered states of consciousness every day whether it is from dreaming, daydreaming, road hypnosis, meditation, or hypnosis. Even some mental disorders are considered altered states of consciousness. The information contained in this flashcard set will briefly review you over states of consciousness and provide a closer look at altered states of consciousness.

Front
Back
Being cognizant that you exist individually and separate from society.
Self-Awareness
Individual perception of self and how we act in our environments.
Consciousness
He believed unconscious factors influence our conscious behaviors.
Sigmund Freud
Daydreaming is an example of an _____.
Altered State of Consciousness
_____ behaviors are conscious.
Deliberate
_____ behaviors are unconscious.
Automatic
The person is considered in a different mental state without being unconscious. This different mental state can be produced intentionally, accidentally, or from an illness.
Altered States of Consciousness
_____ are examples of altered states of consciousness because the person can think, see, and feel things that are not real even though the person is asleep.
Dreams
_____ can cause altered states of consciousness because of fever, sleep, or oxygen deprivation.
Illnesses
When a person is bored, he or she may _____. This altered state of consciousness can produce real feelings and/or memories.
Daydream
_____ is an altered state of consciousness where the person is more open to suggestions. For example, this technique may be used to help a person get over the fear of flying.
Hypnosis
_____ is an example of an altered state of consciousness that is used during some religious practices or to help a person handle stress by gaining control of his/her mind.
Meditation
_____ disorders are illnesses that are considered altered states of consciousness because of the effect on a person's emotions and how the person behaves.
Mental
These are used in the treatment of mental disorders and can elicit altered states of consciousness because of the effects on the brain and the person's behavior.
Psychoactive Drugs
Two negative side effects of psychoactive drugs are they may cause a person to experience _____ or _____.

Hallucinations

Delusions

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