Copyright

Student Diversity & Equity In Education Flashcards

Student Diversity & Equity In Education Flashcards
1/39 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Jigsaw Classroom
Students are placed in small groups to work together and solve problems together in these classrooms. This increases student cooperation and can help limit prejudicial attitudes.
Got it
Gender Inequality in Education: Current Issues
These issues are now more subtle than they were, but exist in the way woman are pressured out of certain subjects and the treatment of teachers.
Got it
Title IX
This law was created to remove gender based discrimination from the educational system, including discrimination in sports. It is considered groundbreaking.
Got it
Schooling: Manifest Functions
People see these school functions as obvious and intentional. Examples include socialization and cultural transmission.
Got it
Schooling: Hidden Curriculum
The social attitudes that are typically taught in schools without intention. These attitudes reflect the ideals of society.
Got it
Schooling: Latent Functions
These functions are typically not intentional and people don't often think of them. The fact that individuals often locate romantic partners in school is an example of this.
Got it
Students with Special Needs: Modification
Changes made to the teacher's curriculum in order to address the needs of students with disabilities. This may involve lowering the difficulty of a project for some students.
Got it
Students with Special Needs: Accommodation
These are adjustments to the way information in the curriculum is presented to students with disabilities. This can include giving students extra tools to help them learn.
Got it
Students with Special Needs: Least Restrictive Environment
A guideline that requires schools to keep disabled students in classrooms with their peers as much as possible, to prevent unnecessary removals or isolation.
Got it
Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT)
This teaching method places emphasis on the cultural experiences of students. Teachers using this method try to understand their students' cultural backgrounds.
Got it
Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT): Response to Students
Teachers using this method of teaching should consider the different approaches offered by students, even if they don't match the way the teacher would approach a problem.
Got it
Critical Theory in Education
A theoretical approach designed to examine the best way for the educational system to work for every student.
Got it
Critical Theory in Education: Minorities
This theory looks at the subtle challenges faced by minorities, such as a preference for boys over girls. Teachers are guided to address these challenges to lower their impact.
Got it
Critical Theory in Education: Technology
This theory addresses the fact that not all students can access technology. It encourages teachers to provide time for students to practice with technology in the classroom.
Got it
Introverted Students
Students who prefer activities that are reflective and solitary. Other people drain their energy. They may be quiet and academically gifted.
Got it
Introverted Students: List of Helpful Classroom Activities

Video lessons

Game-based learning

Silent reading

Independent writing

Got it
Language Education: Partial Immersion
In this approach to language instruction, teachers spend half the time instructing in a student's native language and half the time instructing in a second language.
Got it
Language Education: Bilingual Education
This approach to language instruction occurs when teachers use a student's native language to teach academic subjects. Students are also taught a second language.
Got it
Language Education: Complete Immersion
An approach to language education that involves teaching the entirety of class in the language.
Got it
39 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Working with this set of flashcards can help you review culturally relevant teaching and culturally responsive teaching. You can look at options for bilingual instruction and classroom diversity. Information about gender equality and socioeconomic factors in education are also explored. Additionally, this set looks at the functions of school and ways to help students with special needs.

Front
Back
Language Education: Complete Immersion
An approach to language education that involves teaching the entirety of class in the language.
Language Education: Bilingual Education
This approach to language instruction occurs when teachers use a student's native language to teach academic subjects. Students are also taught a second language.
Language Education: Partial Immersion
In this approach to language instruction, teachers spend half the time instructing in a student's native language and half the time instructing in a second language.
Introverted Students: List of Helpful Classroom Activities

Video lessons

Game-based learning

Silent reading

Independent writing

Introverted Students
Students who prefer activities that are reflective and solitary. Other people drain their energy. They may be quiet and academically gifted.
Critical Theory in Education: Technology
This theory addresses the fact that not all students can access technology. It encourages teachers to provide time for students to practice with technology in the classroom.
Critical Theory in Education: Minorities
This theory looks at the subtle challenges faced by minorities, such as a preference for boys over girls. Teachers are guided to address these challenges to lower their impact.
Critical Theory in Education
A theoretical approach designed to examine the best way for the educational system to work for every student.
Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT): Response to Students
Teachers using this method of teaching should consider the different approaches offered by students, even if they don't match the way the teacher would approach a problem.
Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT)
This teaching method places emphasis on the cultural experiences of students. Teachers using this method try to understand their students' cultural backgrounds.
Students with Special Needs: Least Restrictive Environment
A guideline that requires schools to keep disabled students in classrooms with their peers as much as possible, to prevent unnecessary removals or isolation.
Students with Special Needs: Accommodation
These are adjustments to the way information in the curriculum is presented to students with disabilities. This can include giving students extra tools to help them learn.
Students with Special Needs: Modification
Changes made to the teacher's curriculum in order to address the needs of students with disabilities. This may involve lowering the difficulty of a project for some students.
Schooling: Latent Functions
These functions are typically not intentional and people don't often think of them. The fact that individuals often locate romantic partners in school is an example of this.
Schooling: Hidden Curriculum
The social attitudes that are typically taught in schools without intention. These attitudes reflect the ideals of society.
Schooling: Manifest Functions
People see these school functions as obvious and intentional. Examples include socialization and cultural transmission.
Title IX
This law was created to remove gender based discrimination from the educational system, including discrimination in sports. It is considered groundbreaking.
Gender Inequality in Education: Current Issues
These issues are now more subtle than they were, but exist in the way woman are pressured out of certain subjects and the treatment of teachers.
Jigsaw Classroom
Students are placed in small groups to work together and solve problems together in these classrooms. This increases student cooperation and can help limit prejudicial attitudes.
Contact Hypothesis
This hypothesis asserted that being exposed to different people will lower prejudice. The negative effects after Brown v. Board of Education disproved this.
Ethnicity
The cultural heritage shared by a group of people. This is determined by an individual's culture and can influence their customs and food choices.
Race
People who have the same traits transmitted biologically. These groupings are often important in a social context.
Social Minority
A group of people who have been subordinated by the country they are in. These individuals are different culturally or physically from the majority of people in their country.
Creeping Credentialism
This process is common in high-income nations. It occurs when jobs require more and more credentials, making higher education more important.
Higher Education: Low-Income, Pre-Industrial Countries
These countries offer less opportunities for education. Education that is offered is usually found in day-to-day actions.
Compulsory Education Laws
Laws that require children of a certain age to be in school. The U.S. has these laws while many lower-income countries do not.
Low Socioeconomic Status: Relationship to Education
This status can determine the grade schools a child can enter, which can in turn impact the student's ability to attend college. Completion of college may be the only way to raise this.
Low Socioeconomic Status: Improving Educational Outlooks
Parents with this socioeconomic status can improve their children's education by talking to teachers and offering assistance with projects and homework.
Visual Processing Disorder
This disability makes it difficult for students to deal with visual information. They may have trouble writing and reading.
Auditory Processing Disorder
Students with this disability have a hard time understanding what people say to them. They usually do well when they are taught visually.
Dyslexia
A disorder that makes it harder for students to understand written information. These students may confuse their letters and words when they try to write things down.
Nonverbal Disability
This kind of disability is characterized by weak motor skills and difficulties with coordination. Students may also have a hard time following directions.
Teaching Appreciation of Diversity
Teachers can do this by first helping students appreciate themselves. Instructors can then focus on helping students appreciate others.
Teaching Appreciation of Diversity: Strategies

Get students to interview each other

Instruct students to role play as one another

Have students look at what makes them different

Bring in guest speakers

American Cultural Diversity
This country includes lots of cultural diversity and can be described as a 'tossed green salad.' This diversity allows individuals to make unique contributions in the classroom.
Reciprocal Teaching
A classroom activity that involves allowing students to lead discussions. This allows students to share their cultural viewpoints, which fosters culturally relevant learning.
Culture Shock
This problem occurs when people are thrown into an unfamiliar culture. It can lead to anxiety.
Culturally Relevant Teaching
This teaching method requires teachers to modify instruction in response to diversity, e.g. by using reciprocal learning. They also need to understand the non-verbal cues of different cultures.
Non-Traditional Families
Families that break the traditional mold. These include single-parent families, same-sex families, polygamous families, single individuals and families with cohabiting couples.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support