Students & Differentiated Instruction Flashcards

Students & Differentiated Instruction Flashcards
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Motivation: Social Cognitive Perspective
If you follow this perspective on motivation, you believe that self-belief, goals and expectations guide motivation.
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Motivation: Behaviorist Perspective
Individuals who have this perspective on motivation think that motivation occurs because students are trying to reach outcomes to reinforce their behavior.
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Motivation: Trait Perspective
A perspective on motivation that asserts that motivation is a result of an individual's personality characteristics.
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Motivational Index: Effort
Students who work hard to complete a task are demonstrating that they are highly motivated to complete it.
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Motivational Index: Level of Achievement
This index is influence by student choice, persistence and effort. If all other indices are high, this one will be as well.
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Motivational Index: Persistence
Looking at how long a person spends on a task can show how motivated they are. Longer time spent working on a task indicates higher motivation.
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Motivational Index: Choice of Tasks
A person's willingness to choose a task indicates how motivated they are to complete it. If a person freely decides to accomplish a task, they are highly motivated.
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Motivation: Indices
These can be used to determine how motivated a person is to complete a given task. There are four of them.
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Situational Motivation
A special kind of phenomenon that is created by parts of a person's environment. These environmental aspects can increase a student's motivation to study certain subjects or act in specific ways.
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Motivation
We consider this to be a state that is capable of directing, sustaining and energizing human behavior. Students with this pay attention to what they learn and have cognitive processing improved.
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Self-Directed Learning (SDL): Self-Evaluation
Students work on evaluating and reflecting on the results of their learning experience in this component of SDL.
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Self-Directed Learning (SDL): Collaboration
A component of SDL that focuses on getting students to work with their contemporaries as well as adults.
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Self-Directed Learning (SDL): Assessing Learning Needs
Students determine the resources they need to go through the learning process as a part of this component of SDL.
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Self-Directed Learning (SDL): Management and Monitoring
This SDL component requires students to define their goals for learning with help from their teacher. Students look at obstacles along with their strengths and weaknesses.
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Self-Directed Learning (SDL)
This instructional strategy allows students to make decisions about what they'll study and how they'll study it. Teachers usually offer general guidance in this kind of strategy.
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Student-Centered Learning Environment
A learning environment that puts the focus on students and limits the amount of whole group instruction provided by teachers.
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Student Engagement Strategies: Competition
Teachers can use this out-of-the-box strategy by offering prizes to the students who do the best in class or on specific assignments.
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Student Engagement Strategies: Reciprocal Teaching
A teaching strategy that involves having students plan and deliver information to their classmates. Teachers act as facilitators during this process.
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36 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards can help you review how student readiness, student interests, and student learner profiles can be used to differentiate instruction. Strategies to keep students involved with their education will also be discussed. You'll find cards that address self-directed learning and self-regulation. Motivation and its classroom application will be covered as well.

Front
Back
Student Engagement Strategies: Reciprocal Teaching
A teaching strategy that involves having students plan and deliver information to their classmates. Teachers act as facilitators during this process.
Student Engagement Strategies: Competition
Teachers can use this out-of-the-box strategy by offering prizes to the students who do the best in class or on specific assignments.
Student-Centered Learning Environment
A learning environment that puts the focus on students and limits the amount of whole group instruction provided by teachers.
Self-Directed Learning (SDL)
This instructional strategy allows students to make decisions about what they'll study and how they'll study it. Teachers usually offer general guidance in this kind of strategy.
Self-Directed Learning (SDL): Management and Monitoring
This SDL component requires students to define their goals for learning with help from their teacher. Students look at obstacles along with their strengths and weaknesses.
Self-Directed Learning (SDL): Assessing Learning Needs
Students determine the resources they need to go through the learning process as a part of this component of SDL.
Self-Directed Learning (SDL): Collaboration
A component of SDL that focuses on getting students to work with their contemporaries as well as adults.
Self-Directed Learning (SDL): Self-Evaluation
Students work on evaluating and reflecting on the results of their learning experience in this component of SDL.
Motivation
We consider this to be a state that is capable of directing, sustaining and energizing human behavior. Students with this pay attention to what they learn and have cognitive processing improved.
Situational Motivation
A special kind of phenomenon that is created by parts of a person's environment. These environmental aspects can increase a student's motivation to study certain subjects or act in specific ways.
Motivation: Indices
These can be used to determine how motivated a person is to complete a given task. There are four of them.
Motivational Index: Choice of Tasks
A person's willingness to choose a task indicates how motivated they are to complete it. If a person freely decides to accomplish a task, they are highly motivated.
Motivational Index: Persistence
Looking at how long a person spends on a task can show how motivated they are. Longer time spent working on a task indicates higher motivation.
Motivational Index: Level of Achievement
This index is influence by student choice, persistence and effort. If all other indices are high, this one will be as well.
Motivational Index: Effort
Students who work hard to complete a task are demonstrating that they are highly motivated to complete it.
Motivation: Trait Perspective
A perspective on motivation that asserts that motivation is a result of an individual's personality characteristics.
Motivation: Behaviorist Perspective
Individuals who have this perspective on motivation think that motivation occurs because students are trying to reach outcomes to reinforce their behavior.
Motivation: Social Cognitive Perspective
If you follow this perspective on motivation, you believe that self-belief, goals and expectations guide motivation.
Motivation: Cognitive Perspective
This motivational perspective is concerned with the effects of our mental processes on motivation.
Phases of the Self-Regulation Cycle: Forethought
A phase in self-regulation that involves setting realistic goals.
Phases of the Self-Regulation Cycle: Performance / Volitional Control
Individuals at this phase of self-regulation focus on strategies that can help them successfully learn. They go through early self-evaluation.
Phases of the Self-Regulation Cycle: Self-Reflection
The last phase of self-regulation. People at this phase look back on their actions and see if they met their goals.
Self-Regulation Dimensions: Self-Observation
A dimension of self-regulation that involves intentionally tracking your activities. You may record how often and how well you perform a certain task.
Self-Regulation Dimensions: Self-Judgment
You work on this dimension of self-regulation when you look at your current performance and evaluate it in relation to your goal.
Self-Regulation Dimensions: Self-Reaction
This refers to how you react to your self-judgments.
Self-Regulation
A learning process that involves students controlling and evaluating their education.
Student profile aspects used to differentiate instruction

Readiness

Interests

Learner profiles

Differentiating Instruction: Learner Profiles
Teachers differentiate their instruction in this way when they consider the culture, talents, gender, learning style and intelligence of individual students.
Aspects of instruction that can be differentiated

Content

Process

Product

Methods to determine a learner profile

Have students complete a learning profile inventory

Watch students during class time

Speak with parents or caregivers

Learner Profiles: Uses in Differentiation

Assist teachers in varying instruction based on learning style

Provide a chance for competitive, independent and cooperative education

Help students work in small groups, pairs or alone

Differentiating Instruction: Student Interest
A way to change instruction to match the interests of students in class. Have students choose from several assignments that have clear goals, are purposeful and meet educational standards.
Methods to discover student interests

Speak with students

Hand out a questionnaire

Observe how students act

Student Readiness
We use this term to refer to a student's ability to complete an educational task at their present level of knowledge and understanding.
Assessments
These help teachers gauge students levels of readings, math, and writing, and therefore evaluate student readiness.
Differentiating Instruction: Student Readiness
Teachers differentiate instruction in this way by adjusting the difficulty of what they're teaching, changing scaffolding and setting up small groups.

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