The Canterbury Tales Vocabulary Flashcards

The Canterbury Tales Vocabulary Flashcards
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Mein

(Noun) the facial affect or expression of a person. Also can refer to a person's physical appearance or attitude.

Used to describe the nun.

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Yeoman

(Noun) a man holding and cultivating a small landed estate.

Used to reference those accompanying the knight.

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Valiant

(Adjective) to possess or show courage or bravery.

Used to describe the knight.

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Courtesy

(Noun) to be chivalrous, respectful, and polite.

The knight is described to have courtesy.

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Devout

(Adjective) feeling deep commitment to a religion or be loyal to something specific.

In the prologue, the narrator is devout to his faith, which inspires him to go to Canterbury.

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Martyr

(Noun) someone that suffers persecution or death for a greater cause.

St Thomas Becket is described as a martyr.

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Sundry

(Adjective) describes groups with a mixed set of qualities; various, assorted.

Chaucer refers to the lands of the region as sundry.

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Stature

(Noun) the height of a person or thing; how tall it is.

Used to describe the squire.

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Drought

(Noun) prolonged low rainfall, no rainfall, or shortage of water.

Used to describe the setting during winter to spring.

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18 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

In using this flashcard set, you will learn vocabulary used in the novel 'The Canterbury Tales'. The book contains a series of travel stories that are described as a pilgrimage through sundry landscape. It documents the life in medieval England, like jousts, leprosy and martyrs. Utilizing this flashcard set, you will be able to gain an understanding of specific vocabulary used in The Canterbury Tales and a reference to how these words were used.

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Drought

(Noun) prolonged low rainfall, no rainfall, or shortage of water.

Used to describe the setting during winter to spring.

Stature

(Noun) the height of a person or thing; how tall it is.

Used to describe the squire.

Sundry

(Adjective) describes groups with a mixed set of qualities; various, assorted.

Chaucer refers to the lands of the region as sundry.

Martyr

(Noun) someone that suffers persecution or death for a greater cause.

St Thomas Becket is described as a martyr.

Devout

(Adjective) feeling deep commitment to a religion or be loyal to something specific.

In the prologue, the narrator is devout to his faith, which inspires him to go to Canterbury.

Courtesy

(Noun) to be chivalrous, respectful, and polite.

The knight is described to have courtesy.

Valiant

(Adjective) to possess or show courage or bravery.

Used to describe the knight.

Yeoman

(Noun) a man holding and cultivating a small landed estate.

Used to reference those accompanying the knight.

Mein

(Noun) the facial affect or expression of a person. Also can refer to a person's physical appearance or attitude.

Used to describe the nun.

Faculty

(Noun) the inherent powers of the mind.

Used to describe the friar.

Pilgrimage

(Noun) a journey or trip to a renowned or sacred place.

Used to describe what the longen folk go on.

Heathen

(Noun) a person who doesn't belong to a religion or renounces your religions god.

Used to describe the knight.

Joust
(Noun) to make jest and have fun. Used to describe the squire.
Chaplain

(Noun) an ecclesiastic attached to the chapel of a royal court, college, etc., or to a military unit.

Used to describe the prioress's traveling companion.

Appoint

(Verb) to name or assign or appoint by royalty.

Used to describe the sergeant.

Merriment

(Noun) to be cheerful or joyful gaiety; mirth; hilarity; laughter.

Used to describe the pardoner's singing.

Keen

(Adjective) bright or sharp.

Used to describe the yeoman's clothing.

Prioress

(Noun) head of the convent.

Used as the title of the nun.

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