Copyright

The Harlem Renaissance & Literature Flashcards

The Harlem Renaissance & Literature Flashcards
1/20 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Langston Hughes
He's considered to be the Harlem Renaissance's most famous poet. He wrote poems including Harlem and I, Too, Sing America.
Got it
I, Too, Sing America
Langston Hughes wrote this poem about the relationship the black community had with America and how delicate it was. Some think he was inspired by Whitman's I Hear America Singing.
Got it
Harlem: Specific Meaning
This Langston Hughes poem ends by discussing a dream that could explode if unfulfilled. This is likely a reference to the goal of achieving racial equality.
Got it
Harlem
A poem by Langston Hughes that discusses what happens to dreams that can't be fulfilled. He connects dreams and food to show how necessary both are to survive.
Got it
Heritage: Discussions of Religion
This poem by Countee Cullen addresses a disconnection to religion by mentioning that the poet would feel closer to Jesus if they shared a skin color, instead of Jesus being shown as white.
Got it
Countee Cullen
This poet was a vital part of the Harlem Renaissance. Many of this works dealt with the conflicting identities faced by African Americans. He wrote the poem Heritage.
Got it
Heritage
Countee Cullen wrote this poem that details his feeling of being without a home and having no place that offers an ancestral connection.
Got it
If We Must Die
Claude McKay wrote this poem to encourage action following the Red Summer of 1919, a time when many hate crimes were committed. He didn't focus on spirituality with this poem.
Got it
America
A poem by Claude McKay that looks at the good and bad of America. It draws on W.E.B. Du Bois's idea of a dual consciousness, or two-ness, experienced by African Americans.
Got it
Claude McKay
A poet associated with the Harlem Renaissance. Unlike most of the other poets involved in this movement, he was born in Jamaica instead of the U.S.
Got it
20 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

The importance of the Harlem Renaissance is covered by this set of flashcards. You can go over the ways jazz music and Jim Crow laws influenced this movement. You'll be able to consider the importance of W.E.B. Du Bois and his theory of a double consciousness. The works of Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay and Zora Neale Hurston will be explored by these cards.

Front
Back
Claude McKay
A poet associated with the Harlem Renaissance. Unlike most of the other poets involved in this movement, he was born in Jamaica instead of the U.S.
America
A poem by Claude McKay that looks at the good and bad of America. It draws on W.E.B. Du Bois's idea of a dual consciousness, or two-ness, experienced by African Americans.
If We Must Die
Claude McKay wrote this poem to encourage action following the Red Summer of 1919, a time when many hate crimes were committed. He didn't focus on spirituality with this poem.
Heritage
Countee Cullen wrote this poem that details his feeling of being without a home and having no place that offers an ancestral connection.
Countee Cullen
This poet was a vital part of the Harlem Renaissance. Many of this works dealt with the conflicting identities faced by African Americans. He wrote the poem Heritage.
Heritage: Discussions of Religion
This poem by Countee Cullen addresses a disconnection to religion by mentioning that the poet would feel closer to Jesus if they shared a skin color, instead of Jesus being shown as white.
Harlem
A poem by Langston Hughes that discusses what happens to dreams that can't be fulfilled. He connects dreams and food to show how necessary both are to survive.
Harlem: Specific Meaning
This Langston Hughes poem ends by discussing a dream that could explode if unfulfilled. This is likely a reference to the goal of achieving racial equality.
I, Too, Sing America
Langston Hughes wrote this poem about the relationship the black community had with America and how delicate it was. Some think he was inspired by Whitman's I Hear America Singing.
Langston Hughes
He's considered to be the Harlem Renaissance's most famous poet. He wrote poems including Harlem and I, Too, Sing America.
Harlem Renaissance
An artistic movement that occurred during the 1920s and 30s. It involved a huge amount of output from African-American artists.
Jim Crow Laws
Laws passed in many Southern states after the Civil War that restricted the rights of African Americans. These laws led to many people migrating north, fueling the Harlem Renaissance.
Jazz
A type of music that blended African and European sounds. It offered a lot of freedom and bolstered writers to discover new ways to express themselves during the Harlem Renaissance.
W.E.B. Du Bois
A sociologist who explored the idea of a double consciousness. He also founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).
Booker T. Washington
A man concerned with civil rights who thought vocational training was more beneficial than higher education. W.E.B. Du Bois disagreed with him about this.
Double Consciousness
This term refers to the duality felt by people living in a world that requires them to be two things. W.E.B. Du Bois referred to this as a 'two-ness.'
Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston wrote this novel about a woman named Janie trying to find love. It deals with gender roles, much like Chopin's The Story of an Hour.
Their Eyes Were Watching God: Janie
The main character of Their Eyes Were Watching God. Her first two marriages don't work out because she's too headstrong to fit into the role demanded of her.
Their Eyes Were Watching God: Community
This novel provides a very complex picture of African America communities, taking the time to show both positive and negative parts of this type of community.
Their Eyes Were Watching God: Marriages
Many see the three marriages in this book as representing different ways to deal with racial inequalities.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support