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To Kill a Mockingbird Literary Devices Flashcards

To Kill a Mockingbird Literary Devices Flashcards
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When Harper Lee includes indirect references to historical events, such as the Battle of Hastings, she is relying on _____ to provide historical context.
Allusion. Allusion makes an indirect reference to a well-known figure, event, or thing. It can provide historical context or heightened symbolism and significance.
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Harper Lee portrays some of her characters as disliked outcasts in town, but lets the reader see that they are quiet heroes. This is an example of _____ irony.
Dramatic. Lee lets the readers be aware of information that is not perceived by other characters.
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Dramatic Irony
When an author allows the reader to understand something that the characters do not understand or perceive. This creates a contradiction that can be humorous or poignant.
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Verbal Irony
A deliberate contradiction between what one character says and what their words mean or refer to. Ex: the disconnect in how Miss Gates presents America vs. how her town treats African Americans.
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The difference between similes and metaphors.
Similes compare two things using 'like' or 'as,' while metaphors compare two things without those linking words. Harper Lee uses both forms of comparison in To Kill A Mockingbird.
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''The events of the summer hung over us like smoke in a closed room.''

The above quote uses a _____ to draw a comparison.

Simile. Similes use 'like' or 'as' to make descriptive comparisons. Scout describes the heavy feelings as being like trapped smoke.
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''Your name's longer'n you are. Bet it's a foot longer.''

The literary device in the above quote is a _____.

Metaphor. Metaphors compare two things without a 'like' or 'as'. Here Jem is comparing Dill's long name to his height.
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''Punk, punk, punk, her needle broke the taught circle. She stopped, and pulled the cloth tighter: punk-punk-punk. ''

The bold words in this quote are an example of _____.

Onomatopoeia, when a word sounds like the noise it makes. The 'punk' is the sound of Aunt Alexandra's needle as she angrily punctures the cloth.
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Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards reviews how literary devices are used in Harper Lee's classic novel, To Kill A Mockingbird. The flashcard set uses specific quotes from the novel and asks you to identify the various types of literary devices at work: metaphors and similes, personification, onomatopoeia, alliteration, symbolism, foreshadowing, and allusions. Use these flashcards to develop the skill of recognizing when and how authors use literary devices!

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''Punk, punk, punk, her needle broke the taught circle. She stopped, and pulled the cloth tighter: punk-punk-punk. ''

The bold words in this quote are an example of _____.

Onomatopoeia, when a word sounds like the noise it makes. The 'punk' is the sound of Aunt Alexandra's needle as she angrily punctures the cloth.

''Your name's longer'n you are. Bet it's a foot longer.''

The literary device in the above quote is a _____.

Metaphor. Metaphors compare two things without a 'like' or 'as'. Here Jem is comparing Dill's long name to his height.

''The events of the summer hung over us like smoke in a closed room.''

The above quote uses a _____ to draw a comparison.

Simile. Similes use 'like' or 'as' to make descriptive comparisons. Scout describes the heavy feelings as being like trapped smoke.
The difference between similes and metaphors.
Similes compare two things using 'like' or 'as,' while metaphors compare two things without those linking words. Harper Lee uses both forms of comparison in To Kill A Mockingbird.
Verbal Irony
A deliberate contradiction between what one character says and what their words mean or refer to. Ex: the disconnect in how Miss Gates presents America vs. how her town treats African Americans.
Dramatic Irony
When an author allows the reader to understand something that the characters do not understand or perceive. This creates a contradiction that can be humorous or poignant.
Harper Lee portrays some of her characters as disliked outcasts in town, but lets the reader see that they are quiet heroes. This is an example of _____ irony.
Dramatic. Lee lets the readers be aware of information that is not perceived by other characters.
When Harper Lee includes indirect references to historical events, such as the Battle of Hastings, she is relying on _____ to provide historical context.
Allusion. Allusion makes an indirect reference to a well-known figure, event, or thing. It can provide historical context or heightened symbolism and significance.

Foreshadowing in this quote:

''Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy...That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.''

The quote foreshadows (gives hints about what will happen). It hints that an innocent, kind being will be killed, and that we should recognize it as a sin.
Symbolism of the Mockingbird
The mockingbird serves as a symbol of innocence throughout the story. At various times, it can represent Tom Robinson, Boo Radley, Jem, Dolphus Raymond, and Dill.

''From the day Mr. Radley took Arthur home, people say the house died.''

The phrase above uses _____ to describe the house.

Personification, or a literary device that gives human traits to non-human objects. A house cannot literally die, but this personification helps to illustrate how it changed.

Scout describes that ''a two-rut road ran from the riverside.''

Here Lee uses _____, which causes readers to slow down and notice the words.

Alliteration, or the repetition of similar sounds (rut, road, ran, riverside). Lee uses alliteration as a way to highlight important descriptions.
Alliteration in To Kill A Mockingbird
Harper Lee relies on alliteration, or the repeated use of consonant sounds, as a way to pique the reader's attention. For example: ''Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some that...''

''…There was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb County.''

This type of exaggeration is an example of _____.

Hyperbole. Scout uses exaggerated language to describe Maycomb, which conveys her feelings that life is boring and slow where she lives.

'Do you really think you want to move there, Scout?' Bam, bam, bam, and the checkerboard was swept clean of my men.

The bold words in this quote are an example of _____.

Onomatopoeia. 'Bam, bam, bam' is the sound of Atticus's checker pieces clearing away Scout's.

Scout describes that the fire was ''well into the second floor and had eaten its way to the roof.''

She uses _____ to describe the fire's movement.

Personification. Fires do not literally eat, but Scout describes fire in this way to create a vivid image of its destruction.

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