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To Kill a Mockingbird Vocabulary Flashcards

To Kill a Mockingbird Vocabulary Flashcards
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Unsullied

Pure or blameless, without stain, unspoiled or undamaged

Atticus's office in the courthouse contained little more than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama.

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Apprehension

Nervousness

Ladies in bunches always filled me with vague apprehension and a firm desire to be elsewhere, but this feeling was what Aunt Alexandra called being 'spoiled.'

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Tacit

Implied from indirect words or actions

Jem went in grinning, and Calpurnla nodded tacit consent to having Dill in to supper.

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Auspicious

Lucky, sign of favorable outcome

The remainder of my schooldays were no more auspicious than the first.

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Chiffarobe

Large piece of furniture with drawers and a compartment to hang clothes

An' I asked her what, and she said to jus' step on the chair yonder an' git that box down from on top of the chifforobe.

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Antagonize

To evoke hostility from another

Of course Jem antagonized me sometimes until I could kill him, but when it came down to it he was all I had.

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Contemptuous

Scornful, looking down on someone or something

He gave a short contemptuous snort.

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Benevolence

Good-willed kindness toward others

Maudie's benevolence extended to Jem and Dill, whenever they paused in their pursuits: we reaped the benefits Maudie kept hidden from us.

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Malevolent

Evil, intending harm to others

Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom.

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19 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize winning book, To Kill a Mockingbird, is a rich tale of Southern life which addresses numerous social issues. To gain the most from this story, readers much first understand a number of complex terms. These flashcards provide a foundation of vocabulary to help you, the reader, understand and enjoy this classic. Terms are defined with examples from the text to enhance contextual comprehension.

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Malevolent

Evil, intending harm to others

Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom.

Benevolence

Good-willed kindness toward others

Maudie's benevolence extended to Jem and Dill, whenever they paused in their pursuits: we reaped the benefits Maudie kept hidden from us.

Contemptuous

Scornful, looking down on someone or something

He gave a short contemptuous snort.

Antagonize

To evoke hostility from another

Of course Jem antagonized me sometimes until I could kill him, but when it came down to it he was all I had.

Chiffarobe

Large piece of furniture with drawers and a compartment to hang clothes

An' I asked her what, and she said to jus' step on the chair yonder an' git that box down from on top of the chifforobe.

Auspicious

Lucky, sign of favorable outcome

The remainder of my schooldays were no more auspicious than the first.

Tacit

Implied from indirect words or actions

Jem went in grinning, and Calpurnla nodded tacit consent to having Dill in to supper.

Apprehension

Nervousness

Ladies in bunches always filled me with vague apprehension and a firm desire to be elsewhere, but this feeling was what Aunt Alexandra called being 'spoiled.'

Unsullied

Pure or blameless, without stain, unspoiled or undamaged

Atticus's office in the courthouse contained little more than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama.

Tyrannical

Having the nature of a cruel and absolute ruler

She had been with us ever since Jem was born, and I had felt her tyrannical presence as long as I could remember.

Foray

Attack or invasion into hostile territory

Jem threw open the gate and sped to the side of the house, slapped it with his palm and ran back past us, not waiting to see if his foray was successful.

Condescend

Grant favor below one's dignity

Jem condescended to take me to school the first day, a job usually done by one's parents, but Atticus had said Jem would be delighted to show me where my room was.

Arbitrate

To act as an intermediary and negotiator between two parties of a dispute

Jem arbitrated, awarded me first push with an extra time for Dill, and I folded myself inside the tire.

Inquisitive

Having a curious nature

If he wanted to stay inside his own house he had the right to stay inside free from the attentions of inquisitive children, which was a mild term for the likes of us.

Ramshackle

In a run-down condition, dilapidated

(…) a ramshackle porch ran the width of the house; there were two doors and two dark windows between the doors.

Assuage

To relieve discomfort or pain

When it healed, and Jem's fears of never being able to play football were assuaged, he was seldom self-conscious about his injury.

Integrity
Personal character known for honesty and fairness at all times
Prejudice
A preexisting belief, usually negative, about someone or something regardless of the facts
Marginalized
To be treated as lesser in quality, to be denied equal access or treatment

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