Tragedy, Cruelty & Melodrama in Literature Flashcards

Tragedy, Cruelty & Melodrama in Literature Flashcards
1/20 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Waiting for Godot
Samuel Beckett wrote this play, where nothing really happens as two men wait for someone to give their lives meaning. It's an example of the Theatre of the Absurd.
Got it
Theatre of the Absurd
A type of theatre developed to portray the meaninglessness of the world. This grew in popularity after the end of World War II.
Got it
Antonin Artaud
A playwright who developed the Theatre of Cruelty. His works, including The Cenci and The Spurt of Blood, are examples of this kind of theatre.
Got it
Theatre of Cruelty: Characteristics
This kind of theatre uses unnatural, symbolic gestures, strange screams or sounds, and sometimes perverse acts. The audience is often seated in the center of the action, rather than in front.
Got it
Theatre of Cruelty
This type of theatre was developed based on the idea that people are savage and violent but can rise above this if they're made to face their violent drives.
Got it
Melodrama
A literary work that shows good and evil in a moral fight. Good ultimately wins in this genre, which is full of stock characters and exaggerated emotions.
Got it
Melodrama: Penalty
We consider this plot element to be associated with melodramas. It occurs near the end of the melodrama and involves the villain being punished.
Got it
Melodrama: Pangs
In a melodrama, this plot element refers to the damages the villain inflicts on the good characters.
Got it
Melodrama: Provocation
A melodramatic plot element that deals with the reason the piece's villain wants to hurt the hero.
Got it
Romantic Literary Period
A period in literature characterized by an appreciation for natural spirituality, intuition and imagination. Melodrama rose to popularity in this period.
Got it
20 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Checking out these flashcards can help you go over the characteristics of melodrama and its ties to the Romantic period. You'll also find cards that deal with tragedy and the way it has changed over time. These cards address the unique aspects of the Theatre of Cruelty and the works of Antonin Artaud. Furthermore, you can use these cards to get familiar with the Theatre of the Absurd and its connection to existentialism.

Front
Back
Romantic Literary Period
A period in literature characterized by an appreciation for natural spirituality, intuition and imagination. Melodrama rose to popularity in this period.
Melodrama: Provocation
A melodramatic plot element that deals with the reason the piece's villain wants to hurt the hero.
Melodrama: Pangs
In a melodrama, this plot element refers to the damages the villain inflicts on the good characters.
Melodrama: Penalty
We consider this plot element to be associated with melodramas. It occurs near the end of the melodrama and involves the villain being punished.
Melodrama
A literary work that shows good and evil in a moral fight. Good ultimately wins in this genre, which is full of stock characters and exaggerated emotions.
Theatre of Cruelty
This type of theatre was developed based on the idea that people are savage and violent but can rise above this if they're made to face their violent drives.
Theatre of Cruelty: Characteristics
This kind of theatre uses unnatural, symbolic gestures, strange screams or sounds, and sometimes perverse acts. The audience is often seated in the center of the action, rather than in front.
Antonin Artaud
A playwright who developed the Theatre of Cruelty. His works, including The Cenci and The Spurt of Blood, are examples of this kind of theatre.
Theatre of the Absurd
A type of theatre developed to portray the meaninglessness of the world. This grew in popularity after the end of World War II.
Waiting for Godot
Samuel Beckett wrote this play, where nothing really happens as two men wait for someone to give their lives meaning. It's an example of the Theatre of the Absurd.
Existentialism
People who believe in this philosophical idea see the very act of existence as a struggle. It had a lot of impact on the Theatre of the Absurd.
Characteristics of Classic Tragedy: Reversal / Peripeteia
This involves a change in the circumstances of the protagonists of a tragedy. Things go from good to bad when this occurs.
Characteristics of Classic Tragedy: Catastrophe
In this form of literature, this is the lowest point of suffering experienced by the hero.
Characteristics of Classic Tragedy: Climax
We use this term to refer to the greatest time of action in this form of literature.
Characteristics of Classic Tragedy: Recognition / Anagnorisis
The moment when a character gets personal insight based on a discovery.
Neo-Classical Tragedy
A type of tragedy developed in France. It wasn't as original as some other forms of tragedy, because it strove to imitate Greek works.
English Renaissance Tragedy
The tragedies created in this period tended to be darker than Greek tragedies. The hero might not be wholly good in these plays.
Modern Tragedy
This kind of tragedy is focused on everyday people and normal situations.
Bourgeois Tragedy
A type of tragedy that was popular in England and that crowded out Neo-classical tragedy. It drew heroes from normal people.
Classic Greek Tragedy
A play that usually features a tragic hero being subjected to a reversal, catastrophe, recognition, a climax and a resolution.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support