Copyright

Understanding Criminal Law in the U.S. Flashcards

Understanding Criminal Law in the U.S. Flashcards
1/13 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Criminal Case Parties

In these cases, the parties involved include the person(s) being charged and the government. The victim is not a party in this type of case.

Got it
Parties in a Court Case
We use this term when talking about the individuals who are involved with a given court case.
Got it
Criminal Case
A court case that is prosecuted by the government. If the defendant in this case loses, he or she may be sentenced to jail time.
Got it
Civil Case

These are cases where private parties are disputing legally (involved in a lawsuit). If you are found liable in this kind of case, you are forced to pay damages but you don't have to go to jail.

Got it
Burden of Proof: Criminal Law

These types of court cases have a high burden of proof. The prosecution is required to prove that the defendant is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Got it
Burden of Proof: Civil Law
In this kind of court case, the plaintiff faces a lower burden of proof. Guilt in these cases is determined by a preponderance of evidence, which makes the job of the defense more difficult.
Got it

Ready to move on?

or choose a specific lesson: See all lessons in this chapter
13 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This set of flashcards was created in order to help you review information about the criminal law system of the U.S. You can go over ways that criminal law differs from civil law with these cards. Differing requirements for the burden of proof and the parties involved in these cases will be addressed. You can also focus on private law and public law. Furthermore, this set gives you the opportunity to review procedural law, substantive law and the substance of charges.

Front
Back
Burden of Proof: Civil Law
In this kind of court case, the plaintiff faces a lower burden of proof. Guilt in these cases is determined by a preponderance of evidence, which makes the job of the defense more difficult.
Burden of Proof: Criminal Law

These types of court cases have a high burden of proof. The prosecution is required to prove that the defendant is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Civil Case

These are cases where private parties are disputing legally (involved in a lawsuit). If you are found liable in this kind of case, you are forced to pay damages but you don't have to go to jail.

Criminal Case
A court case that is prosecuted by the government. If the defendant in this case loses, he or she may be sentenced to jail time.
Parties in a Court Case
We use this term when talking about the individuals who are involved with a given court case.
Criminal Case Parties

In these cases, the parties involved include the person(s) being charged and the government. The victim is not a party in this type of case.

Civil Case Parties

The parties involved in these cases are private individuals- the victim and the one accused of wrongdoing. The government is not considered a party for this kind of case.

Private Law

This law focuses on disputes between individuals, groups or institutions. It may involve property law, contract law, family law, tort law and succession (estate transfer) law.

Public Law
This law focuses on problems that affect society. It deals with municipal laws, administrative law, criminal law, international law and constitutional laws involving the rights of citizens.
Substantive Laws
The laws that legislature sets up to set guidelines for the behavior of citizens. These laws are responsible for defining crimes and setting up the punishments for these crimes.
Procedural Law
A type of law used to control the flow of a legal case and how the case is processed. These laws cover due process and how long someone can be held after he or she is arrested.
Substance of Charges
Elements involved in a given tort or crime. They're used to prove that a person should be in custody. For example, police must have a reason to think you committed a crime before arresting you.
Due Process

These are the legal rights given to individuals involved in criminal actions. This is associated with criminal law and can focus on making sure someone is not held in jail without charges being filed.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support