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Vietnam War Opposition Flashcards

Vietnam War Opposition Flashcards
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Lyndon Johnson and the Vietnam War
President Lyndon Johnson was not against ending the war in Vietnam, and, in fact, decided to escalate war efforts in July, 1965.
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My Lai
South Vietnam town in which U.S. troops massacred the inhabitants. The massacre was exposed in 1969 and helped reunite the anti-war movement.
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Impact of Vietnam War on the Democratic Primary Election
Because of the turmoil and controversy over Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson announced he would not run again for president in 1968.
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Operation Rolling Thunder
A 1965 operation of continued bombing that instigated an increase in the anti-war movement and protests.
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Ngo Dinh Diem
Protests in the 1950's revolved around criticism for South Vietnam leader Ngo Dinh Diem and preventing nuclear war.
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University of California, Berkeley during the Vietnam War
Anti-war protests at the University of California, Berkeley were well-known for being intense.
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Automatic Student Draft Deferments
Automatic student deferments protected students against the draft. When this protection was lifted in 1966, new chapters of Students for a Democratic Society quickly increased in numbers.
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Case-Church Amendment
The Case-Church Amendment stopped American military in Southeast Asia and was responsible for ending the escalating U.S. involvement in Vietnam.
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Martin Luther King Jr.
Civil Rights Movement leader who took an approach of non violence and encouraged others to peacefully protest the Vietnam War.
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Cooper-Church Amendment
Passed in 1970, the Cooper-Church Amendment was the first sign that Congress was against the Vietnam War. Nixon was against the amendment.
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Flashcard Content Overview

When you think of the Vietnam War, chances are images of protests during the war pop into your mind. Opposition to the Vietnam War was a huge part of history. In this lesson, we will take a look at some of the specifics. Do you know which operation had the biggest impact on the anti-war movement? How about the way that Lyndon Johnson felt about the war? The anti-war movement involved many people from different countries, cultures, and statuses. Protests and sit-ins were televised as people began to question whether the Vietnam War was being portrayed truthfully and accurately. These cards will cover the causes as well as the reactions to the war and the movement against it.

Front
Back
Cooper-Church Amendment
Passed in 1970, the Cooper-Church Amendment was the first sign that Congress was against the Vietnam War. Nixon was against the amendment.
Martin Luther King Jr.
Civil Rights Movement leader who took an approach of non violence and encouraged others to peacefully protest the Vietnam War.
Case-Church Amendment
The Case-Church Amendment stopped American military in Southeast Asia and was responsible for ending the escalating U.S. involvement in Vietnam.
Automatic Student Draft Deferments
Automatic student deferments protected students against the draft. When this protection was lifted in 1966, new chapters of Students for a Democratic Society quickly increased in numbers.
University of California, Berkeley during the Vietnam War
Anti-war protests at the University of California, Berkeley were well-known for being intense.
Ngo Dinh Diem
Protests in the 1950's revolved around criticism for South Vietnam leader Ngo Dinh Diem and preventing nuclear war.
Operation Rolling Thunder
A 1965 operation of continued bombing that instigated an increase in the anti-war movement and protests.
Impact of Vietnam War on the Democratic Primary Election
Because of the turmoil and controversy over Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson announced he would not run again for president in 1968.
My Lai
South Vietnam town in which U.S. troops massacred the inhabitants. The massacre was exposed in 1969 and helped reunite the anti-war movement.
Lyndon Johnson and the Vietnam War
President Lyndon Johnson was not against ending the war in Vietnam, and, in fact, decided to escalate war efforts in July, 1965.
Television During the Vietnam War
Television developed and became a relied-upon method of learning the news during the Vietnam War.
Colonel Loan
Colonel Loan's brutal actions caused others to doubt their reason and motivation for continuing the conflict in Vietnam.
Walter Cronkite and the Vietnam War
When Walter Cronkite gave an extra editorial statement concerning his doubts for victory, it deeply influenced public opinion about the war in Vietnam.
Prominence of Vietnamese Politics in the Media
Vietnamese politics were not emphasized by the media.
Sit-in
A type of anti-war demonstration where a person would occupy a specific, public place as way of protesting a war. Sit-ins were a type of peaceful protest engaged in during the Vietnam War.
Source for Funding Vietnam War
Most of the money to support the war in Vietnam came from the U.S. social welfare program, among other national programs.
Nixon's Vietnam War Policy
Despite looking like he was reducing America's involvement in Vietnam, President Richard Nixon escalated and increased American presence in Cambodia.
The year U.S. troops were withdrawn from South Vietnam
1973
Vietnamization
The belief that the war should be fought by the Vietnamese.
The year the U.S. instituted the military draft during the Vietnam War
1970

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