Writing Argumentative Research Essays Flashcards

Writing Argumentative Research Essays Flashcards
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Arguments: Claim
This is your main point in an argument.
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Arguments: Reason
We use this term to refer to why we believe our position is correct when we're in an argument. It tells us why something should be considered important.
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Arguments: Evidence
These are facts and pieces of information that can be used to support an argument and stop people from questioning your reasons. These are more believable if they're from reputable sources.
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Consequence Statement
A sentence that should make readers aware of how important the issue discussed in an essay is and to warn them what will happen if they ignore the writer. Use this at the end of your essay.
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Conclusion Sentence
Use this sentence to reiterate your essay's main point. This sentence should be the first one in the final paragraph of your essay.
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Argumentative Essay
An essay that attempts to determine if a thesis is true or not by examining the facts and evidence. It looks at one issue and doesn't appeal to a reader's emotions or ethics.
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13 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Accessing this set of flashcards allows you to review the purpose of an argumentative essay. You can consider the main parts of an argument, including the claim, counterclaim, reason and evidence. You'll be able to focus on the importance of the conclusion sentence and consequence statement in an essay. Finally, you can go over the different essay structures that can be used to reach receptive and resistant readers.

Front
Back
Argumentative Essay
An essay that attempts to determine if a thesis is true or not by examining the facts and evidence. It looks at one issue and doesn't appeal to a reader's emotions or ethics.
Conclusion Sentence
Use this sentence to reiterate your essay's main point. This sentence should be the first one in the final paragraph of your essay.
Consequence Statement
A sentence that should make readers aware of how important the issue discussed in an essay is and to warn them what will happen if they ignore the writer. Use this at the end of your essay.
Arguments: Evidence
These are facts and pieces of information that can be used to support an argument and stop people from questioning your reasons. These are more believable if they're from reputable sources.
Arguments: Reason
We use this term to refer to why we believe our position is correct when we're in an argument. It tells us why something should be considered important.
Arguments: Claim
This is your main point in an argument.
Arguments: Main Parts

Claims

Counterclaims

Reasons

Evidence

Arguments: Counterclaim
We use this term when referring to the viewpoint that opposes your claim in an argument.
Audience
The people who will read your paper. To reach them effectively you should use the right tone and formality. You also need to structure your work so they can accept your arguments.
Receptive Audience
A term used to refer to readers who already agree with your argument, or who are at least neutral to it. You should use a classical argument structure for these readers.
Resistant Audience: Argument Structure
When writing an essay for this kind of audience, you should have these sections: introduction, common ground, thesis, reasons and evidence, repeat of argument and the conclusion.
Receptive Audience: Argument Structure
You can write for this kind of audience using the following essay structure: introduction, thesis, background, reasons and evidence, looking at the other side and the conclusion.
Resistant Audience
This kind of audience doesn't agree with your argument. They may demonstrate hostility to your ideas. Rogerian arguments work well with this type of audience.

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