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Wuthering Heights Literary Terms & Flashcards

Wuthering Heights Literary Terms & Flashcards
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Pathetic Fallacy
A form of personification in which elements of nature (wind, sun, landscape) are given human emotional attributes
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Situational Irony
A literary device in which the author sets expectations about what will happen, but then has things turn out quite differently than anticipated.
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Verbal Irony
An opposition between what a character says and what that character means
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Dramatic Irony
When an author reveals important information to the readers, but conceals it from an affected character.
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Dynamic Characters
Characters who change in profound or significant ways over the course of a story
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Static Characters
Characters who do not change substantially over the course of a story
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The 'Other'
A character who is markedly set apart as different, or as an outside presence against whom the 'normal' or central characters define themselves
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Unreliable Narrators
When an author writes from the perspectives of biased narrators, whose opinions and views shape how they tell the story. The reader must discern when the narrators are omitting things or lying.
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Foreshadowing
A literary device in which the author builds suspense by giving hints or clues about what will happen next
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Gothic Literature
A type of literature that explores darkness in humanity. This darkness is often presented through creepy and decaying settings, characters who go mad, and supernatural elements.
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Flashcard Content Overview

Emily Bronte's novel, Wuthering Heights, is full of literary devices. Bronte wrote in the style of Gothic literature and used vivid imagery, symbolism, figurative language, dramatic irony, and unconventional narrative devices. Use this set of flashcards to review vocabulary related to the wide range of literary devices and techniques used by Emily Bronte. These terms can help you to better understand the novel as you read, and to think critically about it as a piece of literature.

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Gothic Literature
A type of literature that explores darkness in humanity. This darkness is often presented through creepy and decaying settings, characters who go mad, and supernatural elements.
Foreshadowing
A literary device in which the author builds suspense by giving hints or clues about what will happen next
Unreliable Narrators
When an author writes from the perspectives of biased narrators, whose opinions and views shape how they tell the story. The reader must discern when the narrators are omitting things or lying.
The 'Other'
A character who is markedly set apart as different, or as an outside presence against whom the 'normal' or central characters define themselves
Static Characters
Characters who do not change substantially over the course of a story
Dynamic Characters
Characters who change in profound or significant ways over the course of a story
Dramatic Irony
When an author reveals important information to the readers, but conceals it from an affected character.
Verbal Irony
An opposition between what a character says and what that character means
Situational Irony
A literary device in which the author sets expectations about what will happen, but then has things turn out quite differently than anticipated.
Pathetic Fallacy
A form of personification in which elements of nature (wind, sun, landscape) are given human emotional attributes
Vernacular
Writing dialogue in the conversational way that ordinary people speak, including dialects, idioms and slang
Elegiac
Mournful or somber, resembling an elegy (a funeral song). The tone of Wuthering Heights could be called elegiac.
Figurative Language
Language that is descriptive, vivid, and sometimes metaphorical, as opposed to literal and exact
Personification
Describing non-human things as though they had human characteristics
Parallels
Characters or settings that have striking similarities, which an author can use to highlight certain characteristics
Imagery
The use of descriptive language to help a reader 'experience' a scene or feeling through their senses
Symbols
Objects or events that signify something else, usually a bigger idea
Symbolic Meaning of Windows in Wuthering Heights
Barriers. The window symbol variously represents a barrier between people, the barrier of social class, and a barrier that traps Catherine in her own circumstances.
Symbolic Meaning of Black Press in Wuthering Heights
The black press is a hallucination of Catherine's, which comes to symbolize insanity, madness, and loss of identity.
Motif
A recurring idea or concept in a story, such as a color, object or character. Some motifs in Wuthering Heights include duality, nature, repetition, and names.
Allusion
A reference to something historical, sometimes religious

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